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Pride and Prejudice gets remixed in this smart, funny, gorgeous retelling of the classic, starring all characters of color, from Ibi Zoboi, National Book Award finalist and author of American Street. Zuri Benitez has pride. Brooklyn pride, family pride, and pride in her Afro-Latino roots. But pride might not be enough to save her rapidly gentrifying neighborhood from becomi Pride and Prejudice gets remixed in this smart, funny, gorgeous retelling of the classic, starring all characters of color, from Ibi Zoboi, National Book Award finalist and author of American Street. Zuri Benitez has pride. Brooklyn pride, family pride, and pride in her Afro-Latino roots. But pride might not be enough to save her rapidly gentrifying neighborhood from becoming unrecognizable. When the wealthy Darcy family moves in across the street, Zuri wants nothing to do with their two teenage sons, even as her older sister, Janae, starts to fall for the charming Ainsley. She especially can’t stand the judgmental and arrogant Darius. Yet as Zuri and Darius are forced to find common ground, their initial dislike shifts into an unexpected understanding. But with four wild sisters pulling her in different directions, cute boy Warren vying for her attention, and college applications hovering on the horizon, Zuri fights to find her place in Bushwick’s changing landscape, or lose it all. In a timely update of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, critically acclaimed author Ibi Zoboi skillfully balances cultural identity, class, and gentrification against the heady magic of first love in her vibrant reimagining of this beloved classic.


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Pride and Prejudice gets remixed in this smart, funny, gorgeous retelling of the classic, starring all characters of color, from Ibi Zoboi, National Book Award finalist and author of American Street. Zuri Benitez has pride. Brooklyn pride, family pride, and pride in her Afro-Latino roots. But pride might not be enough to save her rapidly gentrifying neighborhood from becomi Pride and Prejudice gets remixed in this smart, funny, gorgeous retelling of the classic, starring all characters of color, from Ibi Zoboi, National Book Award finalist and author of American Street. Zuri Benitez has pride. Brooklyn pride, family pride, and pride in her Afro-Latino roots. But pride might not be enough to save her rapidly gentrifying neighborhood from becoming unrecognizable. When the wealthy Darcy family moves in across the street, Zuri wants nothing to do with their two teenage sons, even as her older sister, Janae, starts to fall for the charming Ainsley. She especially can’t stand the judgmental and arrogant Darius. Yet as Zuri and Darius are forced to find common ground, their initial dislike shifts into an unexpected understanding. But with four wild sisters pulling her in different directions, cute boy Warren vying for her attention, and college applications hovering on the horizon, Zuri fights to find her place in Bushwick’s changing landscape, or lose it all. In a timely update of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, critically acclaimed author Ibi Zoboi skillfully balances cultural identity, class, and gentrification against the heady magic of first love in her vibrant reimagining of this beloved classic.

30 review for Pride

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hollis

    So here's the thing. I was so so excited about PRIDE. I loved the idea of this modernized retelling (I love the idea of any retelling, really, they just so rarely live up to the hype), I loved that this was an #ownvoices story, and also hello look at that amazing cover, I loved that, too. It's stunning, gorgeous, so so great. And so much of the story itself worked for me.. while so much of it didn't. Straight out of the gate I have to say that I think this was the best contemporary/realized versi So here's the thing. I was so so excited about PRIDE. I loved the idea of this modernized retelling (I love the idea of any retelling, really, they just so rarely live up to the hype), I loved that this was an #ownvoices story, and also hello look at that amazing cover, I loved that, too. It's stunning, gorgeous, so so great. And so much of the story itself worked for me.. while so much of it didn't. Straight out of the gate I have to say that I think this was the best contemporary/realized version of PRIDE & PREJUDICE out there right now. This story is perfectly suited to this setting. The Bennetts become the Benitezes, the loud gregarious warm overly-involved Haitian-Dominican family that rules their little block of Brooklyn; host of block parties, makers of too much food, proud of their roots and their little corner of the world. Darcy and Bingley become the brothers Darcy, a wealthy family who renovate the old crumbling house across from Zuri's family apartment, turning it into a little mini mansion and invading the 'hood with their more affluent, and refined, tastes and attitudes. I loved that this became a clash of culture without making it white vs black. I enjoyed the rich culture that Zoboi infused into the pages of this story, particularly through the character of Madringa, but whereas I should've found PRIDE fascinating and compelling.. I felt it kinda fell flat for me. I hate to say it but I was bored at least half of the time. There were some great shining moments (and again some of my faves were the interactions between Zuri and Madringa) but not everything translated. I felt that Darius' character (the real Darcy) was pretty weak, I don't think enough time was spent on Zuri's prejudices, and I just wish their interactions had been better fleshed out. But I think it was a choice between the culture and the scene vs the relationship and I suppose most people going into PRIDE are already fans, so maybe it didn't get the same kind of focus because of that? It's hard to say. The concept is really great, the way the archetypes of the original characters are overlaid onto their counterparts worked well, but I don't think I actually liked any of these characters, really. I thought the spoken word poetry to express Zuri's feelings pretty wonderful, her essay to get into college was lovely, but.. the dialogue (complete with lots! of! exclamation! points!), the author's style of writing, it felt kinda jarring. The second half of this story is definitely weaker, too, as it tries to convince us our protagonist actually likes her love interest as much as she claims, so I didn't feel it really ended on a strong note -- despite the emotional element at play. It could be that trying to keep PRIDE in the original framework is where the actual story faltered as in trying to solidify Zuri's feelings, Zoboi is also trying to add a checkmark next to the Janae and Ainsley (Jane & Bingley) reunion and I'm not sure that worked, either. It feels strange to want to recommend this book despite my feelings (and rating) but I would. I still recommend this. I mostly enjoyed the experience (pre-second half this was definitely a solid three despite my niggles) and love that there are readers out there who will be able see themselves in the the role of Zuri, in this setting, when they maybe couldn't connect with Lizzie in the original. That alone is worth supporting this novel. 2.5 stars ** I received an ARC from Edelweiss and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)

    "It’s a truth universally acknowledged that when rich people move into the hood, where it’s a little bit broken and a little bit forgotten, the first thing they want to do is clean it up.” Pride is one of those books that I’ve hyped myself up for anf was a nervous wreck before reading because I so desperately wanted to love it. I can happily say that I was hooked from the first sentence and I did not want to put this book down. We follow Zuri Benitez as she tries to hold onto the familiarity "It’s a truth universally acknowledged that when rich people move into the hood, where it’s a little bit broken and a little bit forgotten, the first thing they want to do is clean it up.” Pride is one of those books that I’ve hyped myself up for anf was a nervous wreck before reading because I so desperately wanted to love it. I can happily say that I was hooked from the first sentence and I did not want to put this book down. We follow Zuri Benitez as she tries to hold onto the familiarity of her quickly changing neighborhood. When the wealthy Darcy family moves in across the street, and her older sister Janae starts to fall for Ainsley, Zuri fights to hold onto herself and her home as everything is rapidly moving forward. Things I liked My absolute favorite thing about this story, and what drew me to it initially, was the commentary on gentrification and class that was expertly woven with a classical story. I feel like it modernized the story in such an authentic and relevant way that I was floored and would recommend Pride on that criteria alone. I loved seeing Zuri’s perspective on her changing neighborhood and the pride and identity she found because of where she was from, how that shaped her, and the challenges of leaving that safe space for the first time. It was just so good. Zuri and Darius are a dynamic cuo who completely captured my heart. I loved their banter and bickering. We get to spend a lot of time with them and really see their relationship progress and I was all kinds of here for it. Things I Didn’t Like I would have loved to see more sisterly relationship stuff from the Benitez family, because sibling relationships is always a favorite focus of mine in books, but I understand that wasn’t the focus of this story. There are some really great moments, particularly with Janae, but I always want more. I’m always drawn to modernized retellings, probably because it’s a way to read classics (that I tend to avoid) in a fresh and unique way. Pride is an excellent example of a retelling that really brings new life into a well-known story. The discussion of Pride - in your name, your home, your town, were all so personal and touching, while showcasing universal feelings of unease and doubt when confronting change. Pride was just a jy to read and I loved it more as the story continued. I received a copy of the book from Blazer + Bray via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Tate

    Bring my review back up since it's out today! Review You can also read it on my blog! Expected Pub Date: September 18th 2018  I received a copy from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Five Stars!!  Before I finally write this review of this wonderful book before it comes out ( while juggling my memory since it's been four months since I read it while being sick)I have a confession to make.  Confession : I have never read Pride and Prejudice. I have been meaning too cause I have like this nice Bring my review back up since it's out today! Review You can also read it on my blog! Expected Pub Date: September 18th 2018  I received a copy from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Five Stars!!  Before I finally write this review of this wonderful book before it comes out ( while juggling my memory since it's been four months since I read it while being sick)I have a confession to make.  Confession : I have never read Pride and Prejudice. I have been meaning too cause I have like this nice annoted paperback version of it that my sister bough for me in high school for my Lit class but we never did. We just ending up watching the Keira Knightley version which I told my whole class what was going on.  I mean when you have a sister who loves Jane Austen   and was exposed to other versions early. lol   Before you grab your bonnets and your pearls, I have watched a lot of adaptions of P&P that I did follow along with this perfectly.  I have watched  The Collin Firth Version The Keira Knightley Version  Lizzie Bennet Daries  Bride and Prejudice ( How the fuck I missed that one!) Pride and Prejudice and Zombies  I just thought about it! I did read a version of P&P but it was in manga form. Haha!  So Pride, as you can tell from my confession is a retelling or as Ms. Zoboi is calling it, a remix of Pride and Prejudice in the Streets of Brooklyn following the Bentiez family.  Zuri Bentiez ,( aka our Elizabeth) the second oldest Bentiez sister is a 17-year-old Afro Latina girl who has pride in her roots and trying to navigate the streets of her home as much she trying to navigate her life.  She loves her older sister,Jaene ( our Jane) who has been off to college but is home for the summer to death. She has two younger sisters who she loves but sometimes want to strangle. Also dealing with her loving Mom who loves to cook as much she's trying to hook her two oldest daughters up. ( Mrs. Bennet in the flesh)  She aspires to be a poet and wants to go to college so she can spread her  wings. Things started to change when her neighborhood got new wealthy neighbors, the Darcy family. A wealthy up to do family who fixed an old collapsed in apartment building and turned into a mansion. The Darcy's have two sons, Ainsley (Bingley)and Darius ( Our darling Fritzwilliam Darcy) ( Yeah they are brothers in this version which I'm going to talk about later). While Anisley who is very charming and easy-going around others and to her sister,Daruis  is a very uptight 17-year-old who thinks everyone doesn't have good intentions and doesn't think very highly of people. In other words,he's a straight asshole but have a reason why he's like that which Zuri doesn't know.  Zuri first thinks she hates him and thinks she know what exactly what he is but as she get to know him and see what he truly is ( which is not really an asshole) she start to question her pride and her feelings as well. While learning that the boy she thought she knew cause he grew up on her hood, Warren ( aka our Wickham) is not the person he's all cracked up to be.  Also while also dealing with the perceptive of maybe leaving her neighborhood sooner than she thought she would.  So here's the main reason why I put my confession down and give it a five-star. Even though I haven't read P&P, I had enough information from watching  some adaptations to follow the plot. I think even a person who wasn't familiar with P& P would be able to understand cause Ms. Zoboi's does an amazing job taking the original material and making it her own. She modernization this great piece of literature for the next generation. I can't give two much spoilers but I love her spin on the proposal scene and her take on Darcy Letter to Lizzie about the truth about Wickham. Those are two iconic scenes in the books and the adaptations and she take them to another level. One thing I didn't like was the fact she made her Darcy and Bringley brothers instead of just friends in this book cause it changes the dynamics of the two characters. It should be for the better but it certain things that happen between two characters which is the reason why Darcy the way he is to a certain character ( who names starts with a W) is the reason why I say this.I think them being cousins would have been better cause it could have been under the guise of " Well Anisley is not near the Darcy's home as much so maybe that's why he doesn't know about a particular situation" Them being brothers is like " Well he should know about what this character done to another character who supposed to be close to him so why he's acting nice towards them unlike his brother who really want to beat the shit out them." ( If you read P& P you probably figure out what I'm talking about) That's the only major gripe I have with this book.   All and All this book was the first book in a long time that I finish it in like two days  while I was sick like hell battling with Bronchitis. I just hate it took me so long to write this review. Well Life Happens. lol  Also I forgot to show this. I tweeted Ms. Zoboi after I finished the book in April and she tweeted me back!! I totally didn't fangirl. lol

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lilly (Lair Of Books)

    ARC received in exchange for a honest review Full Spoiler Free review may also be viewed on LAIR OF BOOKS BUSHWICK BROOKLYN MURAL- Photo Cred PLOT There’s so much good to say about Ibi Zoboi’s Pride and why it’s such a relevant read for readers living in New York City or any major city for that matter. This is a Pride & Prejudice re-telling of sorts or as Zoboi calls it, a ‘Remix’ 🖤 but at its heart it’s a story about one girls love for her neighborhood and the effects of Gentrification. We meet ARC received in exchange for a honest review Full Spoiler Free review may also be viewed on LAIR OF BOOKS BUSHWICK BROOKLYN MURAL- Photo Cred PLOT There’s so much good to say about Ibi Zoboi’s Pride and why it’s such a relevant read for readers living in New York City or any major city for that matter. This is a Pride & Prejudice re-telling of sorts or as Zoboi calls it, a ‘Remix’ 🖤 but at its heart it’s a story about one girls love for her neighborhood and the effects of Gentrification. We meet Zuri Benitez, a young Afro-Latina (Haitian-Dominican) who loves slam poetry and everything about Bushwick Brooklyn. Zuri lives with both her parents and three sisters on a city block where everyone knows everyone and they treat each other like family. Her mother nurtures her daughters and the neighbors through her cooking and block parties bring everyone together with food and music. Things in the neighborhood start to shift when a abandoned house across the street from Zuri gets turned into a mini mansion. Zuri and her sisters watch as movers move in pieces of expensive furniture and artwork all the while wondering what kind of family would be occupying this mansion. Zuri is very protective of her neighborhood and the people who have roots there, meeting this new family has her apprehensive. The Darcy family moves in, mom + dad with their two handsome young black sons. Zuri’s sisters immediately introduce themselves but Zuri isn’t trying to be welcoming. For Zuri, this family moving in means a change in dynamics for her neighborhood. All around her are the remnants of gentrification, changes that have changed the landscape of her home. We follow Zuri and her sisters as they navigate college life, college applications, crushes on cute boys, and their identity within the community they were born and raised in as it transforms. It wouldn’t be a Pride & Prejudice remix without the romance of course & that we do get with THE hate-to-love of all ages! 🖤 Zuri may not be acceptant of the Darcy family moving in but she’s also very aware of just how attractive Darius Darcy really is. It’s the pride for the neighborhood she grew up in that keeps her from seeing Darius and his family in a more positive light. Weaved in throughout Pride are themes of Socioeconomic diversity, race, stereotypes, and gentrification that are quite relevant & currently being talked about within many New York City communities. CHARACTERS Ibi Zoboi writes amazing, authentic three dimensional characters with rich voices I just can’t get enough of. Our MC Zuri is passionate about everything & everyone she loves. She values the culture within her community & doesn’t want to see it washed away by gentrification. The dialogue between her and her friends & family felt like home to me as a fellow born & raised Brooklyn native. I love how fiercely protective Zuri is of her sisters and neighbor. Her rose colored glasses have long been gone & she is able to pick up on the stereotypes and issues many in the minority class face. Some of my favorite parts with Zuri are the moments of introspection we get to see through her Slam Poetry. There are so many characters we meet along the way but I LOVED the focus on family and the relationship between all of the siblings. We get to see Zuri interact and cope with seeing her older sister leave for college while she is in her last year of High School herself. We get some humor & overall silliness from Zuri having to now step up as the big sister in house to her younger twin sisters who are a bit of a handful. Zuri is well loved & respected within her community, her good reputation is something she’s proud of as one of the Benitez girls. The community plays its own character as well as they watch over these girls making sure they stay on the right path. Last but not least are the Darcy boys who move into a neighborhood they really don’t know much about. Their family is well off financially and were able to buy the mansion across the street from Zuri’s brownstone home. I don’t believe Darius ever truly understood why Zuri was so proud & passionate about her community & in many ways came off as privileged. It wasn’t Zuri’s job to educate him on his surroundings (although that she did MANY times) but she often found herself trying to make him see that the walls that make up his home don’t change what’s outside. Realizing the Darcy family moving in does serve as a catalyst for change, is perhaps the toughest thing Zuri has had to face. So many interesting characters bring this Bushwick remix to life! ❤ WRITING & FINAL THOUGHTS Although we see the Pride & Prejudice influence in Pride, this story stands on its own as a modern day tale of maintaining your identity in a ever changing city. There’s so much to appreciate in this story, from the authentic dialogue to the relevant issues currently affecting those who live in major cities. Zuri’s community reminds me of the one I grew up in which is but a few blocks away from Bushwick. Community gatherings & block parties where the parents fed the neighborhood was very real. Looking up and seeing the one Grandmother who watches everyone’s kids & worrying about whether she’s going to tell your parents about that boy/girl she saw you flirting with was VERY real haha! but also, the reality of receiving an offer by a landlord to move you out in order for them to sell to a developer for a lump sum is also VERY real. The neighborhood I grew up in no longer looks like what I remember & the debate on whether that’s a good or bad thing is still going strong. Regardless of it all, home is where your loved ones are & this story although bittersweet is one way of looking at a brighter side of things 😉

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    'This is the most I can do right now without calling him everything but a child of God, as Mama would say.'* A retelling of Pride & Prejudice that I can finally get behind. Howwww? I don't even like Jane Austen since I think she's overrated because all she did was write about characters whose biggest problems were falling in love and family drama. Ehh. Pride, however changed that for me because it not only maintained the essence of P&P, it also managed to make the rest of it highly releva 'This is the most I can do right now without calling him everything but a child of God, as Mama would say.'* A retelling of Pride & Prejudice that I can finally get behind. Howwww? I don't even like Jane Austen since I think she's overrated because all she did was write about characters whose biggest problems were falling in love and family drama. Ehh. Pride, however changed that for me because it not only maintained the essence of P&P, it also managed to make the rest of it highly relevant. All the things that are great about Pride are things that Zuri is ultimately proud of from her big family, supportive parents, her sisters (who can be so annoying sometimes which relatable), the bond she has with the landlady, the little bit of magic, her aspirations, her poem writing (!), her neighborhood, all the things that make her home her home even the good ol' drama in the neighborhood. So suffice it to say that Zuri is amazing. She's bossy af and straightforward as hell which I always appreciate when it comes to female characters. She is also extremely judgmental, though which means it's all very intense but hey, character development. I absolutely loved the sisterly bond she had with her elder sister and gosh, I just love her so much. Also, the fact that the whole girl-on-girl hate does a 180 is hella refreshing! The only thing that I can't believe is how she had no idea about Martha's Vineyard or the Maldives? DUDE. The hate-to-love/enemies-to-lovers plot is done so well! While I think that Darius Darcy is quite an unfortunate name LOL, his personality definitely reminded me of Mr. Darcy but wayyy improved. All in all, there are definitely some P&P vibes to be had. I found their arguments and banter to be quite entertaining and how Zuri never fucking backed down ahhh. Also, that mini road trip alskjdhfgk. Anyway. I highly recommend Pride not only because it does a modern retelling of P&P so well but also because it diversifies the hell out of it which is an accomplishment in and of itself. *Quote taken from the ARC and may change upon publication. ------- This book sounds like it just might make me like something Pride & Prejudice related which would be unprecedented AND THAT COVER IS COOL AF

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sami

    LOOK AROUND LOOK AROUND AT HOW LUCKY WE ARE TO BE ALIVE RIGHT NOW. this book. is so freaking good.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    3 1/2 stars It is a truth universally acknowledged that when someone adapts Pride and Prejudice, I will read the crap out of it…no matter how bad it is. Thankfully, this is pretty good, and what's more – it even occasionally transcends the original. Zuri is proud to live with her messy, loud, vibrant Haitian-Dominican family in Bushwick, a close-knit, lower-income Brooklyn neighborhood. When the abandoned building across the street is bought by a bougie family and rebuilt into a McMansion, Zuri is 3 1/2 stars It is a truth universally acknowledged that when someone adapts Pride and Prejudice, I will read the crap out of it…no matter how bad it is. Thankfully, this is pretty good, and what's more – it even occasionally transcends the original. Zuri is proud to live with her messy, loud, vibrant Haitian-Dominican family in Bushwick, a close-knit, lower-income Brooklyn neighborhood. When the abandoned building across the street is bought by a bougie family and rebuilt into a McMansion, Zuri is initially very distrusting of its new residents: the Darcys. Ainsley and Darius Darcy are nice to look at, but their tight khaki pants, rich taste, and holier-than-thou attitudes mark them as different in Bushwick. However…we all know how this goes. Opposites attract, hate turns to love, and the good guy is really the bad guy, etc. What really helps this book become something more than the original P&P is Zoboi’s inclusion of elements that fall completely outside of the story. Where other adapters have been constrained by the overall framework of the original, Zoboi re-imagines the Elizabeth character as a fiery, confident poet who’s passionate about changing the world. Darcy and Elizabeth’s class clash is still present, but Zoboi has a much deeper conversation here about race and how our skin color often dictates how we are “supposed” to act. The inclusion of Haitian food, religion, and ceremony add another layer, creating a rich cultural tapestry that I also enjoyed in American Street. Interestingly, it was also these additional elements that fell a bit short for me. Ultimately, I wanted MORE of Zuri’s poetry, more thoughtful discussions about race and equality, more ceremonies in the basement, more of Zuri’s family, and LESS Pride and Prejudice. The framework of the P&P story actually seemed to hold this story back, such as the relationship between Janae (the Jane character) and Ainsley (Bingley). Like the original story line, Janae and Ainsley have a falling out and then reconnect at the end of the book. However, in a modern-day setting, their re-connection at the end feels unrealistically fast and easy. I am not sure why Janae would take him back after he dropped her like a sack of garbage, but at least they don’t get married! Pride and Prejudice is one of my favorite books, however, so this had to be pretty good to make me wish its plot gone. This adaptation is definitely worth a read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Inside My Library Mind

    More reviews up on my blog Inside My Library Mind As a retelling... I loved that this was a diverse retelling of Pride and Prejudice. And in my opinion, Zoboi picked the perfect setting to retell this story. The Bennets become the Benitezes, who host block parties and have a lovely little community, while Darcy and Bingley become the rich brothers Darcy, who are threatening to completely change the landscape of Zuri's hood. I loved how Zoboi used that premise to retell the Pride and Prejudic More reviews up on my blog Inside My Library Mind As a retelling... I loved that this was a diverse retelling of Pride and Prejudice. And in my opinion, Zoboi picked the perfect setting to retell this story. The Bennets become the Benitezes, who host block parties and have a lovely little community, while Darcy and Bingley become the rich brothers Darcy, who are threatening to completely change the landscape of Zuri's hood. I loved how Zoboi used that premise to retell the Pride and Prejudice story. This is a straightforward retelling, which uses a lot of the original story's elements and but does it in a new, refreshing way. Zoboi does clever things with discussing privilege (and she contrasts two black families in this, which was amazing). However... I hated the writing. Absolutely detested it. This is just exposition for 300 pages. There's no show, it's just tell. All the damn time. It felt basically like the author telling me "and then this happened, and then this, and this is how I felt". I absolutely hated that. I find heavy exposition annoying even in complex Fantasy settings (even though I get that sometimes it's necessary). But there's no need to have such heavy exposition in a contemporary book, and to me, it was a testament of poor writing. Moreover, once I started fixating on the writing, I started to notice a bunch of stuff that I found insufferable. For example, the overuse of the words shady and corny. Let me tell you, the number of times Zuri found things to be corny or shady was disquieting. The dialogue was one of the worst parts of this book for me. It was so jarring and felt so artificial. There was an overuse of exclamation points over and over again, and I cringed on every single page. None of the conversations or interactions felt organic, they just felt so strained and awkward. I disliked the characters Maybe it was due to the writing, but I did not like any of the characters in this book. They felt really two dimensional and lacked any sort of distinctive qualities for me. Moreover, I found them to be really inconsistent and they constantly did things that clashed with what they said and were just basically nonsensical. And their relationships with each other were the worst. I did not find the romance believable at all. I did not find Zuri's hate nor her love for Darius to be well written and I had a hard time believing and investing myself into their relationship. It was just exposition of hate, then an afternoon of small talk (that we were told about, not shown) and then she was in love with him. I hated it on all sorts of levels. To sum up Ultimately, this book was a big disappointment. Am I glad it exists? Absolutely. Did it work for me? Absolutely not. A lot of potential, but for me a miss, and I would not really recommend this one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Latanya (CraftyScribbles)

    Honest chat. I've never read Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice". Did I lose my writing and reading credentials? Do I stand to continue my bookworm status? No. Good. I've survived over forty years of not reading the story nor watching a film adaptation while thriving on pop-cultural osmosis. In other words, I feigned knowledge of the stories in bits and pieces, and that's fine because a sweet and savory retelling of Austen's tale sprinkled with Oshun's love presented itself to semi-virgin eyes. Zur Honest chat. I've never read Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice". Did I lose my writing and reading credentials? Do I stand to continue my bookworm status? No. Good. I've survived over forty years of not reading the story nor watching a film adaptation while thriving on pop-cultural osmosis. In other words, I feigned knowledge of the stories in bits and pieces, and that's fine because a sweet and savory retelling of Austen's tale sprinkled with Oshun's love presented itself to semi-virgin eyes. Zuri Benitez lives with her parents and four sisters, (Janae, Marisol, Layla, and Kayla) in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, NYC. She adores her family and finds pride in their love and support. She's Haitian-Dominican and proud of her roots. She's a homegirl and proud. She's a smart girl and proud. Let's say pride is indeed a vice and, perhaps, a virtue in her life. When two boys move across the street after gentrification makes living in the working-class neighborhood easier, she finds that her class prejudices may create a bind to discovering new friends and experiences. Pros : 1. Representation . She's a working-class girl with dreams, aspirations, and goals, born in a Haitian-Dominican NYC family. Hello! Orisha and Oshun love finds itself in an Austen retelling. Yes! Freshness abounds. 2. A Strong Female Protagonist . She's smart, goal-oriented, and strong-willed. While she can come off as judgemental, she's written to receive a bit of what she kicks via friends and family. 3. Good Writing . Zoboi illustrates clear pictures of Bushwick, and even if you've never visited, you swear you ventured there. Crisp nuances permeate the pages as you read. She's straight to the point and matter of fact in issues involving class, race, and love among teens. 4. Interesting Characters . Though they are semi-based on established characters, new dimensions add themselves when topics mentioned above come to play. 5. Quick Pacing . No dragging. Concise. You move along Zuri's journey without hesitation or eye-roll inducing purple prose. 6. No Need for Prior Knowledge of the Source Material . Even though it's a retelling, one necessarily does not need to know of Austen's original work as the story could stand on its own. 7. The Cover . Not only the dust jacket, but the book's inside cover beautifies the book. I did not remove the jacket once. I wanted people to see what I read. Cons : None really. I dug the story. So, why didn't I give it a 5? I tend to not overuse my 5s. But, c'mon, 4.5's close, right? Maybe I'll check out a P&P film. If I do, it's the Colin Firth version. Definitely. 4.5/5

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Brunson

    DNF at 22% I think I'm being over critical here. But honestly, I really wished Zuri would have just gotten off her high horse. She never gave the Darcy’s a chance and to be honest it's all because they don’t look or act like boys where she’s from. Which brings me to my main reason why I had to stop reading. I get it, she lived in the hood. Did that have to be repeated so many times throughout the book? Every other page was about something “in the hood”. So she lives in a lesser area. Nobody talks DNF at 22% I think I'm being over critical here. But honestly, I really wished Zuri would have just gotten off her high horse. She never gave the Darcy’s a chance and to be honest it's all because they don’t look or act like boys where she’s from. Which brings me to my main reason why I had to stop reading. I get it, she lived in the hood. Did that have to be repeated so many times throughout the book? Every other page was about something “in the hood”. So she lives in a lesser area. Nobody talks like that in the hood. Hell, there really wasn't a need to keep bringing it up or using it as a reason to not like someone. I feel as if the author was trying too hard to get that point across and I ended up feeling like I was getting beat over the head with it. Maybe I’ll come back to it at a later time, but I’m going to put this one on the backburner for now. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna |hayinas7

    Yeah, definitely place this on your list. Mini review: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn1ILtwlN...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I so wanted to like this but...man. The writing here simply doesn’t work. I would have loved for this to be a cool take on class, culture, and prejudice, but the quality of the writing distracted a lot from the themes. Here, take a look: “No they’re not! Those boys look like they’re from One Direction or something,” Layla says. “Look at how they’re dressed. I know a baller when I see one. And no rapper will be wearing them kinda shoes.” “They’re more like Wrong Direction. They don’t look like they I so wanted to like this but...man. The writing here simply doesn’t work. I would have loved for this to be a cool take on class, culture, and prejudice, but the quality of the writing distracted a lot from the themes. Here, take a look: “No they’re not! Those boys look like they’re from One Direction or something,” Layla says. “Look at how they’re dressed. I know a baller when I see one. And no rapper will be wearing them kinda shoes.” “They’re more like Wrong Direction. They don’t look like they belong here,” I say. ... I don’t appreciate anyone throwing shade at my neighborhood, especially people who say words like “totally” and “dude”. ... I can still smell his stank attitude. ... Janae is past thirsty at this point, she’s the Sahara Desert. ... “Colin, you’re such a cornball!” ... “You’re cool, Georgia, but your family is Bougie as hell,” I say. Objectively, I don’t think this sort of writing is bad. If you’re into this sort of very modern language being used in books, you’ll likely enjoy this more than I did. It’s an incredibly colloquial book - think more the tone of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries than Pride and Prejudice. The characters unfortunately didn’t click for me either. Our main character, Zuri, has a whole not like other girls speech: “I know I’m different. That was my point.” “You’re more than different. You’re special, Zuri. I mean, damn. I’ve never met a girl like you.” Oh, and there’s this, which just made me roll my eyes: “I bet Carrie eats fried chicken with a knife and fork. Oh, wait. She’s probably vegan.” “As a matter of fact, she claims to be.” “Figures.” So, not my thing, but still an interesting modern take on a classic story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    I initially went four stars, but after writing the review I can’t see any reason to withhold the fifth star. A pleasant book and a story that will transport you back to your teen years. She has really captured the authentic feel of those teenage worries, the angst around boys, the family dynamics, the anxiety about the future. This is billed as a remix of Pride and Prejudice and I can’t comment on how faithful this one is to that original because I haven’t read it. But anytime you can take a sto I initially went four stars, but after writing the review I can’t see any reason to withhold the fifth star. A pleasant book and a story that will transport you back to your teen years. She has really captured the authentic feel of those teenage worries, the angst around boys, the family dynamics, the anxiety about the future. This is billed as a remix of Pride and Prejudice and I can’t comment on how faithful this one is to that original because I haven’t read it. But anytime you can take a story and make it relevant to a historically ignored audience that is a very good thing. Zuri is the narrator of this story, she is one of five girls living in a cramped apartment in Bushwick, Brooklyn. She is a fierce lover of family, her community and block. She takes a lot of pride in her corner of Bushwick, so when a new family moves on the block in a home they refurbished from a dilapidated state, Zuri is leery of the new neighbors who have constructed a mansion in the hood. The new neighbors have two sons, one around the same age as Zuri and initially they are at odds with each other, mainly due to Zuri’s expectations about how Brooklyn, and in particular Bushwick should be represented and this boy Darius just falls short in Zuri’s overbearing judgement. I think Ibi Zoboi has really nailed the interactions of teens making the story relatable whether one is living in a city, suburb or even rural situation. The story of new person trying to fit in, is universal and Ibi Zoboi takes the particular and gives it that universal feel. I’m sure young adults will enjoy this work, the story moves fast and the prose is set at the right temperature for a YA audience. Ibi Zoboi has quickly become one who the reader can reliably count on to deliver a solid book in an enjoyable fashion. A big thanks to Balzer & Bray and Edelweiss for an advanced DRC. Book drops on Sept. 18, 2018.

  14. 4 out of 5

    ALEXA

    I liked seeing familiar elements from the original P&P story serving as the framework for this modern, multicultural YA tale, and that’s definitely the charming part of this tale to me — the author’s fresh take on the characters, in particular. But I wasn’t quite as invested in this story as I would’ve liked to be.

  15. 4 out of 5

    celeste

    i need this in my life

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cher

    3.5 stars - It was really good. Pride and Prejudice is one of my all time favorite books, so I always love to read an author’s take on a retelling. Zoboi easily has the most original and fresh version that I have read thus far. Things still were far from perfection however. The beginning and end were lackluster but the middle was terrific and brought the overall rating of the book up. Zuri’s poetry and haikus initially were annoying (I’m not a huge poetry fan), but they grew on me by the end and a 3.5 stars - It was really good. Pride and Prejudice is one of my all time favorite books, so I always love to read an author’s take on a retelling. Zoboi easily has the most original and fresh version that I have read thus far. Things still were far from perfection however. The beginning and end were lackluster but the middle was terrific and brought the overall rating of the book up. Zuri’s poetry and haikus initially were annoying (I’m not a huge poetry fan), but they grew on me by the end and a few were rather impressive. I wish certain themes would have not been so repetitive. Readers understood very early on that the story takes place in the hood. We did not need to be told 72 times. I also wish the ending would have been as touching as the original instead of an abrupt wrap up. The dialogue, while accurate, was a sharp reminder of how our society has changed. The contrast between the early 1800’s and modern day colloquial dialogue is embarrassing. Then: There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me. Now: Cool. Sounds like you know your shit. But in the middle of the story, Darius touched my heart and invoked warm gooey feelings reminiscent of the one and only Mr. Darcy. Most retellings fail in this aspect. I also appreciated that the author made the story her own with P&P being a loose basis, rather than a rigid framework. Her subplots do not follow down the exact same paths, which was refreshing. Recommended for other die hard P&P fans, or readers interested in a modern literary analysis of class culture and the effects (positive and negative) of gentrification. ------------------------------------------- Favorite Quote: If I listen closely enough, I can hear Bushwick’s volume turning down real slowly. Getting quiet. My sisters don’t believe me when I tell them that even though it’s still noisy, our neighborhood is getting quieter and quieter every summer, as if the tiny musical sounds that fill up my hood are popping like bubbles, one by one, and disappearing into empty silence. Anybody who’s been in Bushwick long enough is like a musician, and when they leave, we lost a sound. First Sentences: It’s a truth universally acknowledged that when rich people move into the hood, where it’s a little bit broken and a little bit forgotten, the first thing they want to do is clean it up.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    Loved this! Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com! Check out my Bookstagram! Or check out my Jen In Ten reviews on Youtube - get the lowdown on current books in 10-30 seconds! Thanks to the publisher for providing an advance copy for review!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dayla

    I received a copy via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I am so disappointed. I was so excited to read an adaptation of one of my favourite classics--especially one with Latinx characters because I'm Latina. Though my particular culture was not represented food-wise, I did see that Zoboi used the religion that is practiced in Cuba (aside from Catholicism). A religion that my family is heavily involved with and that I am also a part of. Before I get to my deep disappointment in how that w I received a copy via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I am so disappointed. I was so excited to read an adaptation of one of my favourite classics--especially one with Latinx characters because I'm Latina. Though my particular culture was not represented food-wise, I did see that Zoboi used the religion that is practiced in Cuba (aside from Catholicism). A religion that my family is heavily involved with and that I am also a part of. Before I get to my deep disappointment in how that was handled, I want to mention the characters and how their behaviour was a mess. Zuri is probably one of the biggest hypocrites I've ever read about. One moment she's pure judgment, then she gets offended when others judge her. Or, she acts like this "don't mess with me" character, but then is super quick to practically pretend like Darius, the love interest, didn't just offend her. There were so many instances where he was outright rude, or she was outright rude and they just kind of...bypassed it? It just felt like a strong case of plot holes and/or just abandoned storylines. Like, he (view spoiler)[corrects her way of talking to what he believes is proper english. Or when he never stands up for her--NOT ONCE IN THE BOOK does he stand up for her against the people being rude to her. NOT ONCE. She gets mad for 1.2 seconds, then suddenly they're all over each other as if nothing happened. Suddenly she's melty and gooey inside because he is just sooooo yum! (eyeroll) (hide spoiler)] It's like Zuri couldn't decide who she wanted to be, and what would make her mad. I really disliked her, almost from the beginning, with how quickly she judged the hell out of the other male character, Ainsley, and how she treated her sister. I get that this is the prejudice part of the book, but like, it was too much. Also, back to the avoiding conflict thing: this book didn't give us a chance to ache for Darius, or for Zuri to miss him, or want him in the way that Elizabeth ached for Darcy. Someone wrote in their review that this felt like a "then this happened, and then this happened" story and I have to agree. But it's not all Zuri. Darius is also an asshat who kept playing the "I can't help who I am, or who I was raised as" card. It's called compassion, jerk. Especially when you move to a whole new place with whole new people. There were just a lot of situations that were handled really badly. The relationships, the progression of events, that ending. Wtf. I can't. I just can't. Finally, the representation of the Orishas. When I first read that Madrina (which stands for Godmother, so that was fitting) was the daughter of Oshun, which is the Orisha of love, I was excited because the only other book I've read with anywhere near that kind of representation was Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi. For those of you who've read this book, know that when you are talking about the Orishas, it's nearly impossible to only mention one. My stepfather put it best when I asked him about this topic because I wanted to make sure I understood my frustration with the representation of my religion in this book: When you are the child of an Orisha and are "blessed", or acknowledged as this through ceremony, you'll always have two Orishas because it's like a child and their parents' relationship. The fact that only Oshun was referenced in this book for the purpose of love (which is ironically funny because Zoboi specifically mentions at the beginning of the book that Oshun represents more than just love) and that no other Orisha was mentioned was insulting. If you're going to delve into a religion, don't make it just a tool in a romantic storyline. The celebrations and dances and ceremonies were nice, but even if you have a specific Orisha you've been told you're a child of, you still acknowledge the holidays and celebrations of the other Orishas. I found it insulting and it read like little research was put into this aspect of the book. Besides the fact that this book was a mess and that the characters were really dislikable, it was the religion aspect that really threw me off. By the end, I just really wanted it to end. Onto the next one, I guess. Happy reading!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I received an e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Pride and Prejudice meet Brooklyn, Afro-Latino families, lots of comedy, romance and family in this modern retelling of the classic. I loved how multicultural the characters in Zoboi's book were, how Zuri was so headstrong in everything and the romance which developed through the story. It's a refreshing retelling which I enjoyed very much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Romie

    CAN WE PLEASE TALK ABOUT THIS COVER IT'S SO PRETTY I'M CRYING

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    I must confess, I have never read Pride and Prejudice, but I have now read so many retellings, I feel quite familiar with the story, and I really enjoyed the way Zoboi took on Austen. I lived in East Flatbush, Brooklyn until I was almost 14, so I LOVE books set in my place of birth. It was fun visiting some of the many pockets of the borough with Zuri, and remembering why I loved Brooklyn so much. Sitting on the stoop, yelling out the window, playing in the hydrant, attending a block party -- the I must confess, I have never read Pride and Prejudice, but I have now read so many retellings, I feel quite familiar with the story, and I really enjoyed the way Zoboi took on Austen. I lived in East Flatbush, Brooklyn until I was almost 14, so I LOVE books set in my place of birth. It was fun visiting some of the many pockets of the borough with Zuri, and remembering why I loved Brooklyn so much. Sitting on the stoop, yelling out the window, playing in the hydrant, attending a block party -- these were such trademarks of city living, and I smiled with each reference, that brought back a childhood memory for me. Brooklyn was not the only character I enjoyed in this book though. I thought Zuri was pretty fabulous. She was quite fierce and super opinionated, but that had a lot of do with how proud she was. She was proud of her neighborhood, her family, and her heritage, and with each home sold and each building renovated, she saw something she loved changing and slipping away. People, who didn't know and love Bushwick and its inhabitants were coming in and pushing them out. Zuri spent some time reflecting on the gentrification, but I think this was just he tip of the iceberg, when it came to what she really feared - change. I was also a fan of Darius. He was really stuck up in the beginning of the book, but as Zuri, and we, got to know him better, we learned there was a lot more to him, than met the eye. He felt kind of like an outsider. Though his family was wealthy, and he enjoyed the privilege of living in a ritzy Manhattan apartment and attending a posh private school, he was never fully embraced by his peers or his neighbors. The same thing seemed to happen when he moved to Bushwick. This was a definite stumbling block for him, and could explain why he fought his attraction to Zuri. However, once he realized how much more there was to Zuri, he showed a fantastic side of himself, and I really enjoyed watching his affection for Zuri and their friendship grow. This book had such a wonderful family focus! Zuri came from a large, tight-knit family. The dynamic was fabulous, and I loved seeing the sisters interact. There was heaps of love in the Benitez home! But Zoboi also took time to show us how Zuri's neighbors were like family, which is usually the case when you grow up in a real neighborhood. We saw the neighbors celebrate and mourn together, but regardless of the situation, they were there for each other. Zuri's poetry was a wonderful way to share her feelings with the reader. She hid a lot in order to protect herself. These poems gave us a direct look into her mind and emotions, and I really enjoyed reading them. Overall: A wonderful take on an Austen classic, which was told with warmth and humor, and incorporated many timely themes and social issues. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  22. 4 out of 5

    ❈ laura ❈

    I have always thought of Bushwick as home, but in that moment, I realize that home is where the people I love are, wherever that is. ✰✰✰✰ (more like 4.5) Rep: black cast of characters, mc and her sisters are haitian-dominican; mc comes from a poor background. TW: racism and poberty are talked about (in case that's something that could tw you), death, leaked nude photos. One of the goals I had this year was to read Pride and Prejudice for for several reasons. One of them is so I could read retellin I have always thought of Bushwick as home, but in that moment, I realize that home is where the people I love are, wherever that is. ✰✰✰✰ (more like 4.5) Rep: black cast of characters, mc and her sisters are haitian-dominican; mc comes from a poor background. TW: racism and poberty are talked about (in case that's something that could tw you), death, leaked nude photos. One of the goals I had this year was to read Pride and Prejudice for for several reasons. One of them is so I could read retellings and catch the details, but since I've read P&P I didn't read any of them. Oh my god, I'm so happy Pride was my first retelling, and now I want to read all of them (send me your recs). In Pride, we follow Zuri Benitez as our Elizabeth Bennet, she's really proud of her afro-latinx roots and her neighborhood, which is changing for better or for worse. One of those changes was their new neighbors across the street. The Darcy family is completely different to Zuri, they're rich and 'not black enough' according to Zuri. Zuri has to dealt with a lot in this story, she's afraid of losing her sisters to college and boys, she's afraind of her own college application, afraid of the changes that her neighborhood is going through. She doesn't have time to boys, so when the Darcy moves across the street, she isn't willing to take bullshit from them, specially the arrogant Darius Darcy (our Mr. Darcy). But, as we can expect, life have other plans and tthey interact more than they expect, feelings arising. This retelling was very faithful to the original content plot wise, but the new background and the discussion around race/racism added by Ibi Zoboi made it special on its own way. Zuri was a really stubborn mc, sometimes she can really get out of your nerves, but she was so authentic, loyal to her loves ones but not afraid to say her opinion and call you out when it's needed, she really feel like a good characterization of Elizabeth Bennet and I liked her. I didn't care about Darius, but I didn't care about Mr. Darcy either so I guess they transmit the same feeling. But, even though I liked the rest of the cast, I would have loved if we had more of them, we see a lot of Janae, her older sister, but I didn't feel like I know her at all, and I had the same feeling with Zuri's family and Darius' brother (that's the main reason I couldn't give it a full five stars). Also there's a little of girl hating and even slut-shaming that I didn't feel were talked about enough (it's more of a personal though, but sometimes I feel that even Zuri agree with the whole girls can do this or that, why is people going to think about you, you want to ruin your reputation?), plus (view spoiler)[something that I hated is that Warren leaked Georgia nudes and he was doing really good with his life while she was ruined (hide spoiler)] . I would totally recommend this one, it was a quick and interesting read, full of important topics.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cort

    4.25 If you know me at all then you know that Pride & Prejudice is one of my favorite books of all time. I’ve read several retellings of Pride & Prejudice and I have to say that Pride by Ibi Zoboi is now my favorite one. I had a smile on my face the entire time I was reading it. I loved seeing the world through the eyes a young girl struggling to find her footing in a world that was changing without her permission. The poems and the college visit took me back to my days in high school whe 4.25 If you know me at all then you know that Pride & Prejudice is one of my favorite books of all time. I’ve read several retellings of Pride & Prejudice and I have to say that Pride by Ibi Zoboi is now my favorite one. I had a smile on my face the entire time I was reading it. I loved seeing the world through the eyes a young girl struggling to find her footing in a world that was changing without her permission. The poems and the college visit took me back to my days in high school when I was writing poems and trying to figure out what the next step was for me. Thanks for the trip down memory lane Mrs. Zoboi. I’ve been waiting months for this book and it surpassed my expectations. It will sit on my shelf right next to the original and I will re-read them both over the years like I do all my favorites.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    October Owlcrate! Follow link below picture if you want to see the goods =) LINK TO THE GOODS

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rebel Women Lit

    Over the course of the years - decades even - there have been several retellings of Jane Austen's (arguably) most popular novel, "Pride and Prejudice" in film and a template for some novels. Rather than classifying these as the result of an unimaginative creative industry, I'm going to chalk this up to the cultural impact of such a novel. While Jane Austen's novels have always introduced us to heroines that subvert gender stereotypes/expectations, there was something about this headstrong and "s Over the course of the years - decades even - there have been several retellings of Jane Austen's (arguably) most popular novel, "Pride and Prejudice" in film and a template for some novels. Rather than classifying these as the result of an unimaginative creative industry, I'm going to chalk this up to the cultural impact of such a novel. While Jane Austen's novels have always introduced us to heroines that subvert gender stereotypes/expectations, there was something about this headstrong and "stubborn" Elizabeth Bennett that immortalised her character. But there of course was something that was unrelatable about her, especially for little and not so little black girls. Because, while the Bennetts were poor in relation to British aristocracy and propriety (juxtaposed with the wealth of Mr Bingly and Darcy) by the very virtue of her whiteness she possessed a privilege that we could not access or a achieve. So in the many adaptations and retellings of this story, I suppose Ibi Zoboi felt it necessary to transpose it into a context where black American girls can relate on some level or at the very least understand. (Similar to Bride and Prejudice, an Indian adaptation). We currently exist in a cultural climate where appropriation of Black American culture and the gentrification of black-American communities are hypervisible but also where Black American culture is on the brink (or within) another renaissance - progressing by returning to ancestral and traditional ways of seeing the world. It is within this context that we find the Benitez Family (I love that she maintained the names in various ways) a Hispanic (literally Hispañola - a mother of Haitian heritage and a father or Dominican Republic heritage) family in a shifting and quickly changing Brooklyn. Change seemed to have been the prevailing motif that strung Zoboi's story together, centering on the several transformative events happening simultaneously in Zuri's (the protagonist) life. Her neighborhood is being "invaded" by hipster white folks, rich black folks and becoming more upscale, expensive and ultimately foreign, alien, different. Her tight and close-knit family, inspired not only by the closeness in age of the sisters but the cramped space of their small apartment, is on the verge of shifting - her older, collegiate sister wants more for herself and that's a concept Zuri finds…unbelievable. How DARE she want more than us? And these events occur while Zuri is in the middle of her own metamorphosis; her impending transition from high school senior to college freshman and her discovery of love and more importantly, her discovery of herself. It's very easy to zero in on the romance between Zuri and Darius as the focal point, but I believe this book had a lot to do with self-awareness. Zuri's understanding of the world is influenced by her socio-economic positioning and her identity as an Afro-Latinx girl. But her age, in terms of stage of development, was also a factor that guided her actions and interactions. I wouldn't want us to miss that when reading this book, especially with society's need to "adultified" black children . She is 17 years old and that, coupled with the big sister responsibilities that she's had to take on with her three younger siblings, she is PROUD as hell lol. She has an inflated sense of self, wisdom and experience (we see this with her thoughts towards her sister being in love) as you would expect from teenagers; this idea that they are old enough to understand the complexities of humanity by virtue of being on the other end of the teen years.  There were several moments that I rolled my eyes at the interactions between the characters, countless times that I sighed exasperatedly at situations I thought could have been avoided and I can't tell how many times I thought "my god, teenagers are annoying as hell" (myself as a teenager included!) lol. But Madrina, the Santeria practicing (shout out to Ibi for always injecting Afro-Spirituality into her stories) landlady and spiritual guide, throughout the novel, attempts to remind Zuri in various ways that soon enough she'll begin to understand that this world holds far more than she thinks it does. Thankfully, we get to witness Zuri's progress. We get to see her unfolding a little, moving from her righteous pride to being more open to understanding the world and the people around her, and importantly, understanding herself. It was important for me to not review this book with my adult eyes and understand that I am not the target audience and so, if you're at all interested in reading this, take that into consideration. With that being said, however, adult or teenager, we can all relate to infatuation, love (familial and romantic), feeling uncomfortable and downright angry at the changes happening around us and, of course… Pride. Reviewed by Rebel Woman Lit Member, Kristina Neil Thank you to Harper Collins for sending us an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest opinion.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Elaina

    Pride is a stunning modernised remix of the classic Pride and Prejudice. Whether you've read Pride and Prejudice or not you will no doubt enjoy this cute, contemporary. I myself haven't read Pride and Prejudice in it's entirety but I do know the story well. And I have to say that I really enjoyed Ibi Zoboi's take on the classic tale. The book follows Zuri Benitez; as she is quickly thrown off guard by her new neighbours. She's used to her neighbourhood how it is, how it's always been, but things Pride is a stunning modernised remix of the classic Pride and Prejudice. Whether you've read Pride and Prejudice or not you will no doubt enjoy this cute, contemporary. I myself haven't read Pride and Prejudice in it's entirety but I do know the story well. And I have to say that I really enjoyed Ibi Zoboi's take on the classic tale. The book follows Zuri Benitez; as she is quickly thrown off guard by her new neighbours. She's used to her neighbourhood how it is, how it's always been, but things are changing. The wealthy family that moves in across the street, is the icing on the cake and the arrogant boys are the cherry on top of the icing. But other things are changing too, and she has to come to grips with the fact that her life and future may not end up the exact way in which she imagined. “It’s a truth universally acknowledged that when rich people move into the hood, where it’s a little bit broken and a little bit forgotten, the first thing they want to do is clean it up.” Obviously with this being a retelling there are tropes that I have read many times. And even though I really enjoyed the story in a new setting, it was a predictable story and I do wish that the author had added more of plot twist to keep it even more fresh. If you're looking for a quick contemporary and have been waiting for a Pride and Prejudice retelling, I'm pretty sure you'll absolutely love this. I just think that I had way too high expectations. You know when you see a book that's coming out and you read the synopsis that you're given, but then you basically make up the story you want to read in your head and then when you actually read the book there is absolutely no possibility that it will ever meet what expectations you have. That's exactly how I felt while reading this story. It was great but just not exactly what I was looking for. Which is honestly entirely my fault. My advice with this is to not think about it too much and just go straight into reading, that way you'll be more likely to enjoy it. My favourite thing about this book was the equality and how family based it is. It was great to see how Zuri is a character who really has so much pride for her neighbourhood, family and just herself as a person. At times she did get a little annoying though, she may have had pride for the things she believes in but her prejudice was real annoying. But the story is literally a retelling of pride and prejudice so I can't really complain can I? The writing was excellent, I'll definitely be picking up American Street soon, because Ibi Zoboi has amazing talent. In addition the poetry that was intertwined with the story was brilliant, I'm not usually the biggest fan of poetry but somehow I loved it in this book?! “We’re not gonna throw away the past as if it meant nothing. See? That’s what happens to whole neighbourhoods. We built something, it was messy, but we’re not gonna throw it away.” Overall it was a very refreshing, diverse, contemporary with a headstrong protagonist that I would definitely recommend giving a read. Rating: 3 Stars Thank you so much to Harper Collins for sending me an ARC of this lovely book! Disclaimer: All opinions are honest and my own. (Quotes are taken from finished copy.)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    random thoughts until I finish my review “The world could fall apart around me, but we are still a family. It doesn’t matter where we go. Bushwick will come with us. Don’t let your pride get in the way of your heart, mija.” I’m stuck between giving this book 3.5 stars or 4 stars. Pride was one of my most anticipated releases and when I finally managed to get my hands on a copy I couldn’t wait to start it. It was an enjoyable read but some things bothered me. - I enjoyed that this was a remix of Pr random thoughts until I finish my review “The world could fall apart around me, but we are still a family. It doesn’t matter where we go. Bushwick will come with us. Don’t let your pride get in the way of your heart, mija.” I’m stuck between giving this book 3.5 stars or 4 stars. Pride was one of my most anticipated releases and when I finally managed to get my hands on a copy I couldn’t wait to start it. It was an enjoyable read but some things bothered me. - I enjoyed that this was a remix of Pride & Prejudice, which happens to be one of my favourite books. - I enjoyed matching each character from Pride to the characters from the original - Zuri was such a strong character! - I really enjoyed Zuri’s visit to Howard University - The build up between Zuri and Darius 👌🏽 - Georgia was so cute! - Warren, Layla, and Carrie - side eyeing you three 😒 - Layla’s character was SO annoying LOL. - I’m not 100 happy with the ending. I wanted more 🤔 - I really would have preferred if at the end there was an epilogue for 1 year later 🤷🏽‍♀️ * full review to come *

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

    Always here for a good diverse retelling of pride and prejudice.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Who Reads

    Looking for a romcom + coming of age story wrapped together really nicely? Also a Pride + Prejudice retelling in Brooklyn? THEN PICK THIS UP!!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Misty

    What the what?!? GIVE ME IT.

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