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30 review for The Divided Earth

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    The Divided Earth concludes The Nameless City Trilogy, preceded by The Nameless City and The Stone Heart. It’s Hicks’ most ambitious and accomplished work so far, a comics meditation on violence in society and the role young people might play in shaping that process. The story is a fantasy adventure with political implications focusing on the partnership of two young people, Kai and Rat, who come from different factions in the area of Daidu, or what most people in the area call The Nameless City The Divided Earth concludes The Nameless City Trilogy, preceded by The Nameless City and The Stone Heart. It’s Hicks’ most ambitious and accomplished work so far, a comics meditation on violence in society and the role young people might play in shaping that process. The story is a fantasy adventure with political implications focusing on the partnership of two young people, Kai and Rat, who come from different factions in the area of Daidu, or what most people in the area call The Nameless City. In this graphic comics trilogy for young people, probably most likely for tweens, there are four young people who are main characters, Kaidu, Rat, Ezri and Mura. Daidu is just the latest name given to a city by the most recent conqueror, but most residents know that with the next violent conqueroring will come a new naming, so most townies just say the heck with renaming it. It’s somewhere in Asia, located critically near the sea, important for trade routes, so that’s why people want to conquer it. Kaidu or Kai is of the Dao faction, sent to the city as a soldier, who befriends Rat, who lives in the city. Two other young people that are central are Ezri, the General’s son, now the General of All Blades, who essentially wants to rule the city, and his bodyguard Mura, who basically wants to destroy it and start over. They find an ancient book that they believe possesses secrets, such as the secret formula for Napatha, a fire that can destroy enemies, eat through stone (Makes me think of nuclear warheads, the ultimate conqueroring instrument). Kai and Rat, from different factions, are anti-war. They are like the European Union or the United Nations. They are pro-democracy and peaceful cooperation. The last book is full of action, but the basic move is a face-off between these two opposing views, two different approaches to governance, even as another potentially conquering nation heads to the Nameless City, led by the Yisun Army. We are led to support the friendship of Kai and Rat, who come from troubled and broken upbringings, and their peaceful approach. Mura is interesting in that she is a kind of terrorist or violent anarchist. All positions are articulated well, and we get to know the characters representing them as complex and interesting. I like the small but important role played by the monk. I like it that Rat in the end finally tells Kai her real name. I really like the friendship—running and leaping from building to building—of Kai and Rat. So the book is great, written for young people, focused on adventure and friendship and anti-violence as a key for preserving the planet, in an anti-colonialist spirit, even in the face of the Endless War we are experiencing on the planet now. The artwork by Hicks is wonderful—pencilled digitally, hand-inked, a great approach that makes it feel more intimate, and the coloring by Jordie Bellaire increases the essential warmth of the story. No one is better than Hicks at drawing both action sequences and emotions in children's comics right now. I'm a fan of her work, such as Friends with Boys and The Adventures of Superhero Girl. This is her best so far, though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/09/2... The Divided Earth is the final book of The Nameless City trilogy, and wraps the narrative up in a thrilling and satisfying conclusion! Preceded by books The Nameless City and The Stone Heart, the story takes place in the fictional city Daidu, named by the Dao’s, the most recent conquering nation. However, due to centuries of conquest, the inhabitants of many different nationalities simply call it The Nameless City. This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/09/2... The Divided Earth is the final book of The Nameless City trilogy, and wraps the narrative up in a thrilling and satisfying conclusion! Preceded by books The Nameless City and The Stone Heart, the story takes place in the fictional city Daidu, named by the Dao’s, the most recent conquering nation. However, due to centuries of conquest, the inhabitants of many different nationalities simply call it The Nameless City. This politically important Asian city sits alongside a mountain pass and is the only route to the sea, making it a critical location for trade and military movements. An ancient people carved a passageway through the mountain, but the technology they used has been lost to the ages. The main characters are teen Kaidu, a Dao recently of the distant Homelands who is sent to the city to train as a soldier, a street-wise girl named Rat who has lived in the city her whole life, Ezri, who is the General’s son and who has just taken drastic measures to rule the city and his dangerous bodyguard Mura. These four young people have just discovered a mystical tome in the monastery that they believe has powers to dominate all the surrounding nations. Ezri and Mura take the book that holds the formula for making Napatha, a powerful fire that can destroy armies and eat through stone, and plan to use it for the Dao nation to remain in control of the city. Both have complex and diverging reasons for wanting this power, and author Faith Erin Hicks deftly weaves in their back stories to explain their viewpoints. We see how Ezri desperately justifies his actions, and his layered portrayal shows that he isn’t crafted to be a pure villain in the story. Additional characters come into play, as adults from Kai and Rat’s life play integral roles in trying to thwart the war that Ezri and Mura are intent on starting. The conclusion has Ezri and Kai, two young men who come from privileged upbringings, face off. Paired with that, is the poignant confrontation between Mura and Rat whose backgrounds include tragedy and broken homes. These matches between the pairs show how similar starts in life don’t always lead to the same paths; as love and support from others and your own personal integrity can help shape you. The conclusion is satisfying, with a three year time jump to show a realistic wrap up to the story. A few details were a bit pat, but as the story is geared towards young readers, the arcs for the four main characters ended appropriately. I was invested in the city’s inhabitants and would love to visit them again in a future story by Hicks. As such, I was excited to be approved for this book by NetGalley, so I could get a sneak peek at how the series concludes. Hicks has crafted a story that tied in adventure, friendship and the cost of war. She creates a believable world inspired by 13th century China and her artwork was wonderful with the precision of her backgrounds and how she captures emotion. The coloring by Jordie Bellaire is lovely- and her work should get a shout out, as a colorist’s work establishes an aesthetic that is a crucial part of the storytelling. This captivating trilogy is a must read, not only to a YA audience, but also with older readers who will enjoy the nuanced tale. Rating: 4.5/5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A pretty solid ending to a good series, though there was an overreliance on way-to-convenient coincidences and slam-bang action. The fourth star in my rating belongs solely to Kata who shows up for the first time and practically steals the show. (Solo spin-off book needed now!) (p.s., It doesn't take anything away, but I'm peeved that in an editorial oversight, a minor character's name changed from "Iniko" in the second volume to "Eniko" in this one.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Reid

    It's so good!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Tyler

    The Divided Earth is the third (and final) book in The Nameless City series by Faith Eric Hicks. It is currently schedule for release on September 25 2018. The book begins where the second book in the trilogy, The Stone Heart, left off. Readers do need to read this series in order to understand and enjoy the story fully. Kai and Rat might need to sacrifice everything for peace. The city is under new rule, and if they cannot stop the tragic events that are in motion the cycle of war, death, and vi The Divided Earth is the third (and final) book in The Nameless City series by Faith Eric Hicks. It is currently schedule for release on September 25 2018. The book begins where the second book in the trilogy, The Stone Heart, left off. Readers do need to read this series in order to understand and enjoy the story fully. Kai and Rat might need to sacrifice everything for peace. The city is under new rule, and if they cannot stop the tragic events that are in motion the cycle of war, death, and violence will continue. The added challenge of treachery inside the palace and an army quickly approaching the outer walls raise the stakes and the likely-hood of everything ending badly. The Divided Earth is a solid graphic novel, and a good conclusion to a trilogy. As always, her art work is stunning and adds a great deal to the story and character development. I simply love the style and coloring. In the story itself, I liked the efforts that Kai, his parents, Rat, and many of the characters went through to do what they thought best for the greater good, and the city specifically. Like in real life, people's ideas of what is best, what is right, and what should happen is always varied and sometimes quite different. I like the development and tension built around what would happen with the city, and our major players, come the final conflict. It was very well done, but I felt like I could have gotten to know a few of the secondary characters a little more (like Kai's mother) but got more that I expected with the return of some younger characters from the earlier books. I enjoyed the adventure and he danger, I think the political and military posturing was very well build and explored. I was fully engaged with the read, and kind of want an epilogue to see what might happen well after this story ended, what does the future hold in the long term for Kai and Rat, does peace last, and where do Kai's parents end up. The conclusion tied up all the necessary loose ends, but I was invested enough to still be curious. The Divided Earth is a solid conclusion to the trilogy. although I will admit to wanting to see what might happen in the Nameless City in the years to come. I was satisfied, but still want more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    Thank you to Netgalley for the free e-copy. I really liked the first two books in this series and this is a great conclusion. I don't "know" if this is true, but I "feel" like the art is scratchier, not as polished as the previous books. But I'm not sure. I do like how the story concludes, that violence is not inevitable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    The third volume in The Nameless City trilogy does not disappoint. Finally, Rat and Kaidu are allowed to witness a peaceful resolution between the city's conquered and its conquerors - something that rarely happens in reality, so it's very nice to see it in fiction. Faith Erin Hicks' art, as always, is sharp and delightful. I received access to this title via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    An absolutely satisfying conclusion to one of my favorite graphic novel series in the past few years.

  9. 5 out of 5

    laurel [suspected bibliophile]

    The thrilling conclusion to the Nameless City trilogy! As Rat and Kaidu try to figure out how to get back at Erzi and Mura and subvert their plan to destroy the Yisun army with an ancient and powerful weapon, Kai's father and the monk Joah run into old friends...or possibly enemies. I loved this MG graphic novel trilogy so much. The artwork is absolutely stunning, and the storyline is riveting and doesn't shy away from tough topics like colonialism, the cycles of war and peace, conquering nations The thrilling conclusion to the Nameless City trilogy! As Rat and Kaidu try to figure out how to get back at Erzi and Mura and subvert their plan to destroy the Yisun army with an ancient and powerful weapon, Kai's father and the monk Joah run into old friends...or possibly enemies. I loved this MG graphic novel trilogy so much. The artwork is absolutely stunning, and the storyline is riveting and doesn't shy away from tough topics like colonialism, the cycles of war and peace, conquering nations, power imbalances, hatred, and how to fight without fighting (and that there is a way to win without death and fighting)—and what it means to sacrifice everything for a place and people that you love. There were quite a few plots and subplots, which were all wrapped up pretty well. Joah's mysterious origins are revealed, we learn more about Mura's motivations and her manipulation of Erzi (honestly, I wanted to see more of this because Mura is a really fascinating character), and Rat tells Kaidu her real name. TL;DR: if you enjoyed the first two installments, you'll love this one. I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    My son owns and has read the first two books in this series, and I know he enjoyed them, but I went in to number three basically blind. Nonetheless, I seriously enjoyed it. I probably would have benefitted from the context the first two books would have provided, but it wasn't strictly necessary. I love the complexity of the relationships in this graphic novel-- both between individual characters and between different social groups. The story had a lovely flow, and was very satisfying, and the a My son owns and has read the first two books in this series, and I know he enjoyed them, but I went in to number three basically blind. Nonetheless, I seriously enjoyed it. I probably would have benefitted from the context the first two books would have provided, but it wasn't strictly necessary. I love the complexity of the relationships in this graphic novel-- both between individual characters and between different social groups. The story had a lovely flow, and was very satisfying, and the art is well drawn and well suited to the story.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    It was fine. I wish there had been more involvement from the city. More people fighting for change. More... well, people. There were seriously 8 people leading the attack on the Dao palace and maybe 12 soldiers fighting back. I guess I wanted it to feel like a city full of people fighting for what they believed in and wanted. And even though the story made that point, the art didn't execute it very well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kris Springer

    Great series; wonderful art and a message about friendship and hope and trust. A very touching relationship between the 2 protagonists, developed over the course of the 3 books. I will probably go back and read all 3, right in a row, to re-experience the character development and remind myself of some of the plot twists from the 1st 2. Worth the read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie Florida

    I have loved Rat and Kai from the beginning and I loved seeing how their story came to a close. Their character arc, the story of the city, and the story of tragedy and hope, are truly beautiful. This series was truly remarkable. ♥ I have loved Rat and Kai from the beginning and I loved seeing how their story came to a close. Their character arc, the story of the city, and the story of tragedy and hope, are truly beautiful. This series was truly remarkable. ♥️

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    More thoughts to come

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I had downloaded this tween graphic novel from Netgalley, but it was archived before I could get a chance to actually read it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I liked it. Good art and colors. Story was ok. Good friendship and perseverance themes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tara Schaafsma

    Last book in this series. So good.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    The Divided Earth is a satisfying conclusion to the Divided Earth trilogy. Without sharing any spoilers, the storyline wraps up in a way that makes sense, and leaves everyone changed. There's a feeling of justice being served, even if not everything is perfect. In particular, Rat contrasts with Mura so well in the final actions of the series. The pairs in this book - Kaidu and Erzi, Rat and Mura, the Dao and rival nations - each deliver a great example of how differently life can turn out when p The Divided Earth is a satisfying conclusion to the Divided Earth trilogy. Without sharing any spoilers, the storyline wraps up in a way that makes sense, and leaves everyone changed. There's a feeling of justice being served, even if not everything is perfect. In particular, Rat contrasts with Mura so well in the final actions of the series. The pairs in this book - Kaidu and Erzi, Rat and Mura, the Dao and rival nations - each deliver a great example of how differently life can turn out when paths diverge. The entire series is so painstakingly illustrated that you can get lost in the backgrounds. The characters are thoroughly developed but also change over time, growing together and apart. It's an entirely engaging series for readers of all ages.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    The story felt a little too simple. I wanted something more. Over the series, I have wondered who the target audience is. A lot of times if felt very juvenile, but then it gets very dark and seems like it's meant for a more mature audience. In the end, it was fine. Just fine.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kellee

    A perfect continuation of the story with a look at politics and family with action and awesome characters just like the first two volumes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Review based on a digital ARC provided via Netgalley. In the conclusion of The Nameless City trilogy, Faith Erin Hicks brings all of the threads from the previous books together to weave a satisfying conclusion. To begin, the Dao continue to occupy the Nameless City, with Erzi as the General of All Blades, bent on control of the city and destruction of all who oppose him. To that end, he has gained control of a book that holds the formula for napatha, an explosive weapon. With Mura by his side, t Review based on a digital ARC provided via Netgalley. In the conclusion of The Nameless City trilogy, Faith Erin Hicks brings all of the threads from the previous books together to weave a satisfying conclusion. To begin, the Dao continue to occupy the Nameless City, with Erzi as the General of All Blades, bent on control of the city and destruction of all who oppose him. To that end, he has gained control of a book that holds the formula for napatha, an explosive weapon. With Mura by his side, they are poised to take complete control. However, Rat and Kaidu know of this plan and are intent on stealing the book to keep this from happening. This ever ingenious duo plan to gain entry to the palace, overcoming obstacles in their way. Meanwhile, the Yisun Nation is on the doorstep of the city and Kaidu’s father, Andren, has a plan to intercept them in an attempt to stop the war through dialogue. The entrance of a monk named Kuo and Kaidu’s mother, Kata, further widen the cast of characters and deepen the plot. Will all of these forces be able to work together for peace and the dream of the Council of Nations or will Erzi be triumphant and solidify control? Motivations for Erzi and Mura are more fully realized in this volume, as is the relationship between Kaidu’s parents. While Rat and Kaidu’s stories are not given the bulk of the narrative, their quest for peace and their continued friendship in the face of differences, drives the story forward. Never giving up, they push for understanding between the races. The confrontation between Erzi and Kaidu is action packed and exciting. The battle between Mura and Rat is similarly action packed, but has added depth, as it delves into motivations, revealing bits about the character of both. While the conclusion is a bit fast and convenient, it is hopeful. For a middle grade graphic novel, it is sufficient. I think it is important that Hicks included an afterword that emphasized the length of time that it takes to begin to affect change. One comes away from this book with a greater understanding of the importance of reaching out to those who hold differing opinions and of holding onto those friends who are dear, bringing together all of those forces to create change. It also offers one the opportunity to ponder whether it is better to leave potentially dangerous knowledge uncovered or have the choice to use that knowledge for good. That is a difficult question to answer and would make for good classroom discussions. Overall, this three book series is enjoyable. The art style is clear and the colors are well done. The art is consistent from the first book to the last, allowing one to easily recognize characters. Rat (her real name is finally revealed in this book, but I won’t spoil it here) and Kaidu are easily relatable characters, whose friendship and adventurous spirit children will love. They will also appreciate their dedication in standing up for what they believe in, and it is important that the adults in this story listen to them and take them seriously. Although more of the former happened in the first two books, it echoes in this third installment. However, rather than rely on adults to do the right thing, Rat and Kaidu take matters into their own hands in order to ensure a positive outcome. I think this is a good balance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    The City is once again the crossroads of impending conflict. Erzi has his right hand woman preparing the ancient secret napatha they recovered from the hidden book of the founders of the City. Erzi doesn’t trust anyone with it but the two of them, and he’s none too stable since the coup. Meanwhile Kaidu’s father (the Dao general) and Joah the monk are trying to contact the Yisun army outside the city before the attack to see if a more peaceful solution can be found. They run into another unexpec The City is once again the crossroads of impending conflict. Erzi has his right hand woman preparing the ancient secret napatha they recovered from the hidden book of the founders of the City. Erzi doesn’t trust anyone with it but the two of them, and he’s none too stable since the coup. Meanwhile Kaidu’s father (the Dao general) and Joah the monk are trying to contact the Yisun army outside the city before the attack to see if a more peaceful solution can be found. They run into another unexpected group on their way. Inside the city, Kaidu and Rat are trying to sneak back into the palace to steal the book that contains the napatha instructions. They both feel that the napatha secrets belong to the City’s true residents instead of the Dao. But the palace isn’t as easy to get into and out of as before, and more is at stake if they are caught. There are a lot of things to tie up in this final book, but Hicks pulls it off swimmingly. I have several students who have been eagerly waiting for this one ever since book two was devoured. I think they’ll be quite happy with this book too. There’s a good amount of action for everyone. I personally like how Hicks worked in the themes of debating just violence and nonviolent options to peace in her high action tale for readers to chew on. It’s not preachy and it is certainly realistic in that nonviolent attempts don’t always work out. But there’s also hope that nonviolent resolutions are worth working towards and may even be possible on both small and large scales. I think what I like best is looking at the themes of how the City is a melting pot and the debates about who belongs there, and especially the way that is resolved (sorry, no spoilers, just saying I like it). As an expat in a very international community, I SO get that and I know that my students all do too. It is nice for them to have imaginary places that in some ways mirror the complexities of their own lives. And many of them will identify with Kaidu’s feeling that the City and Rat are more home/family to him than any other place he’s lived. Erzi is an interesting contrast to Kaidu in that he also was trying to figure out where he belonged, but went about trying to find a place for himself in all the wrong ways. Both of these fictional third culture kids provide characters real life third culture kids will get. They may not like Erzi, but they will definitely get him. And maybe the TCKs who are struggling to find how they fit will pause a moment to ponder whether they are being a better Kaidu or Erzi. Great stuff. Highly recommended to anyone who likes light fantasy tales of complex locations, high action adventures, and graphic novels that explore deep topics in very entertaining ways. Notes on content [based on ARC]: No language issues. No sexual content. There are a few battles with several knife/sword wounds, black eyes, and nasty ouchies on page but nothing very gory. An explosion happens and it is suggested that people die because of it, but no bodies are shown. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/th... The Divided Earth The Nameless City, Vol #3 By Faith Erin Hicks ISBN: 9781626721609 Author Website: faitherinhicks(.)com Brought to you by OBS reviewer Caro Review: The Divided Earth begins with people burning evidence of a tool that can serve as a powerful weapon against any war. One woman saves the only instructions left in order to build the weapon, claiming that future generations can protect themselves if they have the knowledge to create it. She writes down http://openbooksociety.com/article/th... The Divided Earth The Nameless City, Vol #3 By Faith Erin Hicks ISBN: 9781626721609 Author Website: faitherinhicks(.)com Brought to you by OBS reviewer Caro Review: The Divided Earth begins with people burning evidence of a tool that can serve as a powerful weapon against any war. One woman saves the only instructions left in order to build the weapon, claiming that future generations can protect themselves if they have the knowledge to create it. She writes down the instructions in a book and gives it to the temple monks so they can hide it and keep it safe. Time passes and an imminent war is approaching. It is time to retrieve the tool that will help the city defeat their enemies. In the present there are still people that believe that the tool is too dangerous and would cause more harm than good. The book is taken from the monks by the new General of Blades and given to his right hand Mura to decipher and recreate. Kai, son of a Dao general, and his friend Rat, a girl living with the monks, plan to steal the book from Mura after seeing what the weapon can do. Meanwhile, Kai’s father searches for allies to help him defeat the General of Blades and take over the Nameless City. The story has several points of view, but the two most important are Kai and Rat’s, and the Dao general’s. Kai is within the city, which lets the reader view what is going on the inside of the wall, while his father is outside letting the reader view the “enemy army”. The characters that caught more my attention were the monks, they help throughout the conflict between the city and the outsiders even though they are against violence, the monks find the way to help. And there is one more character that was interesting, but that would be a spoiler. The comic’s design within the city is a combination of vibrant colors such as reds and oranges, with only key characters in blue or dark, while the scenes outside the walls are earthy colors and grays or whites and key characters in reds. The design is detailed and with great backgrounds. The Divided Earth is a story of friendship and teamwork, and finding your way through war. The story is interesting and nicely paced, the dialogue captures your curiosity to know the outcome and learn more about the characters. From a comic fan to another, I recommend The Divided Earth. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kimberlee

    I received a free digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Whew. It feels like it's been forever since I read Volume 2 of this series. This volume starts where The Stone Heart left off. Rat and Kaidu must deal with the fractured and tragic events that have once again put The Nameless City in turmoil. What's even worse, there's an army on the horizon. If something isn't done soon, there will be war and the cycle of death and violence of the Nameless City will continue. I think I received a free digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Whew. It feels like it's been forever since I read Volume 2 of this series. This volume starts where The Stone Heart left off. Rat and Kaidu must deal with the fractured and tragic events that have once again put The Nameless City in turmoil. What's even worse, there's an army on the horizon. If something isn't done soon, there will be war and the cycle of death and violence of the Nameless City will continue. I think this is the last volume in this graphic novel series? Or, at least, it read that way. Overall, The Nameless City is a solid graphic novel trilogy. On the surface, the action, art, settings, and characters are good. I would definitely recommend it to my juvenile readers at the library who are constantly hungering for new graphic novels. I especially liked the character designs for the main protagonists and how the city itself was drawn. That said, there was just something missing for me while reading Volumes 1-3. I never really related with any of the characters. The plight of the City wasn't something that really got too in depth. All problems were settled really quickly, so I didn't have to put much investment in worrying where the plot would go. I think, really, if there had just been more of a lot of things, then graphic novel would have been amazing. I wanted to know more about the Named culture and history, but it only touched on few things. Solid read. 3/5 stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    Siina

    I really enjoy Hicks' The Nameless City series and The Divided Earth was a wonderful continuation to the story. The best part is the political aspect of it and the fact that there are no bad guys, just people with different views and reasons. In this third part our heroes end up in the middle of shenanigans and basically no one trusts no one. Everyone is after the book that contains the formula for powerful weaponry, gun powder I take it. The Nameless City is under the Dao rule and those people I really enjoy Hicks' The Nameless City series and The Divided Earth was a wonderful continuation to the story. The best part is the political aspect of it and the fact that there are no bad guys, just people with different views and reasons. In this third part our heroes end up in the middle of shenanigans and basically no one trusts no one. Everyone is after the book that contains the formula for powerful weaponry, gun powder I take it. The Nameless City is under the Dao rule and those people want everyone out, but who can really own a city and what makes people eligible to even rule? I liked the reasoning a lot and how people made allies in order to create a better place to live for everyone. It keeps me thinking that perhaps this world isn't so doomed. This story could take place in the current world too and I do hope we find our happy ending. The art works so well with the story and creates this slightly old feeling to it. The panels are clear and Hicks moves the story a lot without words or with minimum of them. The movement works smoothly and the atmosphere is great. The comic is very meaningful and has this feeling of a bazaar. A melting pot of people. I love the parts when Hicks just offers us images of the city and the life there. The Divided Earth is very good, although perhaps not mind-blowing, but still an interesting view to a familiar setting we keep repeating over and over again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ARC via Netgalley. I'm ambivalent about the conclusion to this series. The art is absolutely beautiful and I very much enjoyed the characters, especially Kaidu's parents, but something about the way the opposition between Rat and Miura is set up rubs me the wrong way. It's hard to put my finger on what it is exactly -- maybe that Rat's arguments against Miura's nihilism are all so naive? Even though Rat is clearly the person the reader is meant to identify and agree with, she sounds like a child ARC via Netgalley. I'm ambivalent about the conclusion to this series. The art is absolutely beautiful and I very much enjoyed the characters, especially Kaidu's parents, but something about the way the opposition between Rat and Miura is set up rubs me the wrong way. It's hard to put my finger on what it is exactly -- maybe that Rat's arguments against Miura's nihilism are all so naive? Even though Rat is clearly the person the reader is meant to identify and agree with, she sounds like a child arguing that the power of friendship outweighs the adult concerns of Miura, who has experience on her side when she says that so long as the City remains politically, financially or militarily valuable, outsiders will continue trying to take it over. And Miura is a lunatic, so she shouldn't sound like the more sensible person in this argument! "We now have the recipe for Greek fire and can blow up any new attacking armies if we have to" seems like it should have been part of Rat's argument, rather than just "I'm friends with this kid so I trust that his mom and dad will treat us fairly, unlike literally every other conqueror in the long history of our city's oppression, and we shouldn't fight anymore." I understand that this is a book for younger readers but I feel like the conclusion is too facile and undermines how *difficult* nonviolence is.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karissa

    This is the third and final book in the Nameless City series. I have absolutely loved this series; it’s such a well done graphic novel series and an intricate fantasy. I love the world-building, the politics, the characters, and the story here. Erzi has taken control of the Nameless City and is threatening use a horrible weapon on the city to end the war once and for all. Rat and Kai must steal the weapon and find a way to finally bring peace to the Nameless City. This graphic novel is incredibly This is the third and final book in the Nameless City series. I have absolutely loved this series; it’s such a well done graphic novel series and an intricate fantasy. I love the world-building, the politics, the characters, and the story here. Erzi has taken control of the Nameless City and is threatening use a horrible weapon on the city to end the war once and for all. Rat and Kai must steal the weapon and find a way to finally bring peace to the Nameless City. This graphic novel is incredibly well put together. The illustration is very well done, full of great detail and color and very easy to follow. The world-building was amazing and I loved all of the characters. Kai’s mom finally joins the story in a big way and I really enjoyed learning more about her. I loved the way everything was wrapped up. This was just an excellent conclusion to an amazing fantasy graphic novel series. Overall I highly recommend this whole series. I loved pretty much everything about it. My whole family read this graphic novel series (husband and 11 yr old son) and they all really enjoyed it. I am really looking forward to seeing what Hicks will work on next!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Book Nerd Shenanigans

    I enjoyed the premise of this series but it left me wanting. It was hard to get through honestly. The art work was cute and interesting though. Given the limited space a graphic novel provides there were elements of the story that seemed to be missing. Characters were mildly fleshed out and overall they seemed two-dimensional. There was not enough to really connect to them and their troubles. The world building could be fantastic with more space to tell the story. On the other hand, the action s I enjoyed the premise of this series but it left me wanting. It was hard to get through honestly. The art work was cute and interesting though. Given the limited space a graphic novel provides there were elements of the story that seemed to be missing. Characters were mildly fleshed out and overall they seemed two-dimensional. There was not enough to really connect to them and their troubles. The world building could be fantastic with more space to tell the story. On the other hand, the action sequences went on for way too long. This concept may have played out better in a multiple volume setup. I would recommend it to young adults and middle school readers but I feel that adult fans would be disappointed. Thank you to NetGalley for the e-arc in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    children's graphic novel (4th grade and up?) - diverse action/adventure (lots of fighting in this one). **Reviewed from uncorrected e-galley** We get to read some of the backstories in this one, finding out more about the main characters (Kai and his family, Mura), but my overall impression (from scrolling through this title on my Adobe reader) was fighting, fighting, action, action! It also portrays the different views/different sides in this particular (fictional) war--why do some choose to figh children's graphic novel (4th grade and up?) - diverse action/adventure (lots of fighting in this one). **Reviewed from uncorrected e-galley** We get to read some of the backstories in this one, finding out more about the main characters (Kai and his family, Mura), but my overall impression (from scrolling through this title on my Adobe reader) was fighting, fighting, action, action! It also portrays the different views/different sides in this particular (fictional) war--why do some choose to fight (or not), how much some are willing to give up, etc. Recommended to kids who read the first two books in the trilogy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

    Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read a digital copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. Just like the first two novels, this third and final volume was enjoyable. Like her other works, I really enjoy Faith Erin Hicks' artwork and storytelling. She weaves a fantastic plot of politics, intrigue, and loyalty within friendship and to your birthplace. It was a great follow-up to the other two. The only thing I felt lacking was that this volume seemed to have ended to Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read a digital copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. Just like the first two novels, this third and final volume was enjoyable. Like her other works, I really enjoy Faith Erin Hicks' artwork and storytelling. She weaves a fantastic plot of politics, intrigue, and loyalty within friendship and to your birthplace. It was a great follow-up to the other two. The only thing I felt lacking was that this volume seemed to have ended too quickly. Other than that it was great and I look forward to reading other graphic novels written by her in the future!

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