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Just So Stories: Fiction-Short Stories

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It is an excellent short stories for individuals who love short stories.


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It is an excellent short stories for individuals who love short stories.

30 review for Just So Stories: Fiction-Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    How The Kipling Got His Reputation Once upon a time, Best Beloved, when the world was middle-aged and good Queen Victoria sat on the throne, there was a Kipling. And even though he constantly had to carry around a White Man's Burden (an object, by the way, which he had invented himself, and very proud he was of it too), he was as happy as the day is long. And he would often stop for a moment, and sing a little song he'd written, which beganMamma Pajama rolled out of bed and ran to the po-lice sta How The Kipling Got His Reputation Once upon a time, Best Beloved, when the world was middle-aged and good Queen Victoria sat on the throne, there was a Kipling. And even though he constantly had to carry around a White Man's Burden (an object, by the way, which he had invented himself, and very proud he was of it too), he was as happy as the day is long. And he would often stop for a moment, and sing a little song he'd written, which beganMamma Pajama rolled out of bed and ran to the po-lice stationand endedSeein' me and Sambo down by the Rudyard Maybe you know a song that's a bit like that, Best Beloved, and you're wondering why this one is different? But we'll get to that shortly. The rest of this review is available elsewhere (the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    What an infuriating book. I don't know what infuriates me more: that Kipling was a racist imperialist colonizer who believed firmly in white superiority and conveyed that in every word of these stories; or that Kipling is such a marvelous writer of the English language. Kipling the colonizer, imperialist, racist, supremicist, had no trouble at all mugging the oral traditions of the peoples his people colonized to tell his "Just So Stories" to his Best Beloved. No trouble at all mimicking their vo What an infuriating book. I don't know what infuriates me more: that Kipling was a racist imperialist colonizer who believed firmly in white superiority and conveyed that in every word of these stories; or that Kipling is such a marvelous writer of the English language. Kipling the colonizer, imperialist, racist, supremicist, had no trouble at all mugging the oral traditions of the peoples his people colonized to tell his "Just So Stories" to his Best Beloved. No trouble at all mimicking their voices with disgusting condescension, rewriting origin tales, creating new origin tales, playfully interweaving the inevitability of England's rise as though fated (as he does so deftly in How the First Letter Was Written & How the Alphabet Was Made by making his generative tale appear to be something it isn't). Kipling's Just So Stories are propaganda at its most magical. They're friendly propaganda. They're propaganda of subtlety. And Kipling was a master. And it works so well because Kipling was so talented. Love him or hate him, I think it would be difficult to make a case that he was an untalented writer. What Kipling could do and did do repeatedly with the English language was astounding. He was a master. And his gifts were such that even today countless people I know personally, who consider themselves enlightened folk, make excuses for Kipling. The most common excuse I hear is, "He's a product of his time." But in Kipling's lifetime were men like Richard Francis Burton, Mark Twain, Roger Casement, George Orwell, and countless others, who didn't see the world, or the "white man's" place in the world the way Kipling did. Many were anti-Colonial, anti-Imperial, and not racist at all. Many of Kipling's contemporaries saw colonized peoples as victims, human beings deserving of dignity, not "sullen peoples" to be brought "toward the light." So this main excuse really doesn't hold up, though it's easy to voice because Kipling's stuff is so well written and likeable in its nastiness. I read this to my youngest daughter, my two year old, and she seemed to be dazzled by the sound Kipling's words made coming out of my mouth. I am hoping she's too young for any of his meaning to take seed in that fertile ground. Because the seeds of Kipling bear only ugly fruit. One last scary thought: what would the world be like if someone like Hitler had had the literary talent of Kipling. It makes me shudder.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, originally published in 1902, are perennial favourites, and can be read by adults and children alike. They are known as "pourquoi" stories; in this case fantasies about the origin of individual wild animals who live in different countries. The seed of the idea lies in the story "How Fear Came," within Rudyard Kipling's "Second Jungle Book" of 1895, when Mowgli hears the story of how the tiger got his stripes. It is possible this gave the author the idea for a w Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, originally published in 1902, are perennial favourites, and can be read by adults and children alike. They are known as "pourquoi" stories; in this case fantasies about the origin of individual wild animals who live in different countries. The seed of the idea lies in the story "How Fear Came," within Rudyard Kipling's "Second Jungle Book" of 1895, when Mowgli hears the story of how the tiger got his stripes. It is possible this gave the author the idea for a whole collection. The stories are told quite colloquially, in a chatty, entertaining style. "Now this is the next tale, and it tells how the Camel got his big hump," is a typical beginning. Apart from some stylistic whimsical quirks, such as the narrator frequently calling the reader, "O my Best beloved", or commands such as, "Be quiet, O you person without any form," from the characters, they feel surprisingly modern and inventive. The recurring theme is of a particular animal being modified from its original form by the acts of Man, who is represented as just another creature, or by some magical being. For example, in "The Beginning of the Armadillos", Stickly-Prickly Hedgehog and Slow-Solid Tortoise cunningly gradually take on aspects of the other's behaviour, in order to outwit Painted Jaguar. As the tortoise becomes more able to curl himself into a ball, and the hedgehog teaches himself how to swim, they begin to resemble their original forms less and less. In the end they are virtually indistinguishable, and the mother jaguar recommends to Painted Jaguar that he call them "Armadillo" until he finds out their proper name. The narrator comments, "So that's all right Best Beloved. Do you see?" In "How the Camel got his Hump", the grumpy, lazy Camel emits a "Humph!" whenever he is asked to work. A djinn punishes the camel's refusal to work for three days, by saying that he must work longer between times of eating, and must live on his "Humph!" "We call it a hump now, not to hurt his feelings" comments the narrator. For the purposes of the story, then, the animals are heavily anthropomorphised. They do however retain features of the present-day animal's behaviour, and some vocabulary from the countries where the animals live is often included. This collection assembled in 1987, includes the most popular stories: How the Whale got his Throat How the Rhinoceros got his Skin How the Camel got his Hump How the Leopard got his Spots The Elephants' Child The Beginning of the Armadillos The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo The Cat That Walked by Himself The Butterfly That Stamped It is a large format book, and interspersed in the text are pen and sepia ink drawings. There are also some whole-page water-colour illustrations, all by Meg Rutherford. For the original book of 13 stories in 1902, Rudyard Kipling provided his own illustrations from wood-cuts. The stories seem timeless, and this fact, plus their imaginative and fantastical content, goes a good way to explaining their continued popularity. They can be read aloud over and over again, and never seem to lose their whimsical charm.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    All these tales are like Aesop's fables about how various animals got their characteristic features. They are beautiful short tales - most likely derived from folk legends that Kipling heard during his time in Africa and India - but still full of humour and subtle wisdom. Unlike Kim, his pro-empire attitude does not really pollute the innocent atmosphere of these wonderful stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This was an adorably sweet collection of stories, aimed at younger readers and all centring around the themes of animals. Whilst not scientifically correct in the least, this offered the reader a series of fun anecdotes about how various different animals got their defining features, such as a leopard and his spots and an elephant with his trunk. My main source of enjoyment with this book came from its amusing usage of language. Alliterative terms, onomatopoeic phrases, odd pairings of words, and This was an adorably sweet collection of stories, aimed at younger readers and all centring around the themes of animals. Whilst not scientifically correct in the least, this offered the reader a series of fun anecdotes about how various different animals got their defining features, such as a leopard and his spots and an elephant with his trunk. My main source of enjoyment with this book came from its amusing usage of language. Alliterative terms, onomatopoeic phrases, odd pairings of words, and colourful imagery dotted each paragraph, making this both a highly visual read and one that would really shine when read aloud. Whilst I did find this a fun and entertaining little read I did also find that the nature of each story began to feel a little predictable, as the anthology wore on. Whilst I understand its appeal is largely for a younger audience, I became a little disenchanted with its whimsy when I found it to retain only this one tone. Still fun and still worth a read, but perhaps to be best enjoyed when the reading of each story is spaced out.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    These stories were funny, imaginative, and well written. I have read several reviews that talk about Kipling being Imperialistic, condescending, and a host of other distasteful names. But here's the deal...he wrote these tales in different times and they were written for his children. I think such judgments might be slightly anachronistic; however, I do think Kipling says some things that are grating to our modern ears and sentiments. I wasn't getting the whole "white man's burden" vibe that som These stories were funny, imaginative, and well written. I have read several reviews that talk about Kipling being Imperialistic, condescending, and a host of other distasteful names. But here's the deal...he wrote these tales in different times and they were written for his children. I think such judgments might be slightly anachronistic; however, I do think Kipling says some things that are grating to our modern ears and sentiments. I wasn't getting the whole "white man's burden" vibe that some people were, though.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The book that made me fall in love with storytelling. I still have my mother's hardbound edition, with marvelous color plates, published in the 20s. Kipling may have been a romantic apologist for the British Empire, but the man knew how to weave a spell in children's stories, and he can be quite playful and inventive with language. Just read the first line of any number of stories and you'll immediately understand his timeless appeal. My favorites are from The Cat that Walked by Himself -- "Here The book that made me fall in love with storytelling. I still have my mother's hardbound edition, with marvelous color plates, published in the 20s. Kipling may have been a romantic apologist for the British Empire, but the man knew how to weave a spell in children's stories, and he can be quite playful and inventive with language. Just read the first line of any number of stories and you'll immediately understand his timeless appeal. My favorites are from The Cat that Walked by Himself -- "Here and attend and listen; for this befell and became and behappened and was, O my best beloved, when the tame animals were wild." The rhythm is absolutely hypnotic! My other favorite is from The Elephant's Trunk -- "In the high and far off times, O my best beloved, the elephant had no trunk." These stories are just as delightful for adults as they are for children. (I'm 53 and never tire of rereading them!)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    OK, he's a racist blackguard, but Kipling does write beautifully. This was his first book I read in the original and I loved every bit of it - the stories and the pictures. Since I was too young to understand the latent racism (and there's so much of it in here, apparently) when I read it, and I have not reread it since, I will rate it based on my original reading experience - five golden stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nadin Adel

    They always say: "Never give a child a book you won't read for yourself" and I agree. I will be reviewing as long as I go through this book, so here we are: >> How the Camel Got his Hump? A dreadful tale about a camel who is lazy that as a result, a genie makes humps for the camel, end of story. This is dreadful for a number of reasons: 1- The camel has those humps which are a miracle in its essence. The camels use it to feed and nourish because they are meant to live in harsh environments They always say: "Never give a child a book you won't read for yourself" and I agree. I will be reviewing as long as I go through this book, so here we are: >> How the Camel Got his Hump? A dreadful tale about a camel who is lazy that as a result, a genie makes humps for the camel, end of story. This is dreadful for a number of reasons: 1- The camel has those humps which are a miracle in its essence. The camels use it to feed and nourish because they are meant to live in harsh environments of scarce resources of food and water. That shows the greatness of The God, Allah, who created it in such perfection for us to get to know him. So they are not a curse upon it by a lame genie to go by for him and his generations. 2- The idea that is inspired through the tale, the idea of "The First Sin" that is inherited by the generations all along till the end no matter how the generations behave. This in not just and idea for a children story telling, in the matter of fact, it is to induce this kind of mindset to make sure that the first sin is of no use to relapse it and to be forgiven, which endorse them into practicing bad deeds and encountering diverse sins and wrong doings. >> How the Rhinoceros got his Skin? The Parsee wrong doing implications is held by the Rhinos from then and forever, another bad behavior inducing in the idea of someone claiming the results of our bad behavior. >> The Crab That Played with the Sea This story was the most disappointing of the whole "Just So Stories". It demonstrates the Creator of the universe as a magician!! It also shows that the Creator is not fully aware of what goes around. Were some of the creatures are missing up with his creation! At the end of the story, the wrong doer compromises the Creator/magician, not to mention that the Creator/magician doesn't want the creatures to live and gain full strength, then they might strengthen on him! How nonsense!! At the very end, the wrong doer also says that the Creator/magician didn't pay him much attention like that he paid to son of Adam. That's why he missed up! Afterwards, the Creator/magician confess of this truth! Isn't that somehow a demonstration of Satan (Devil) and mankind? Don't you think that the writer is trying to reach a message to readers? This is how atheists are made, thinking that their creator is unfair, and that Iblis is innocent! Please reread children stories and think of the story essence and the messages coming through before ever handing it to a kid. Hope that helps. >> The Butterfly that Stamped Some of the facts are almost true. However, the rest could be Israelis - إسرائيليات - or from Rudyard deep imaginations that are most likely from the rest of his stories. P.S.: Just found out while reading about WWI through the book World War I, that Rudyard Kipling's son, John Kipling, was a soldier in the British army. He wrote this book around 10 years before engaging in the war. And he lost his son in the process. Rudyard and his wife waited for their son to return, as he was among the missing and though his body was never retrieved. Nadin Adel 30/11/2015

  10. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    Beautiful and wonderful. Works of genius by a man who freed himself enough that he could give himself up to that genius instead of trying to make sure that it came out perfectly. As pleasing as his other works are, none I've read can match the joy, humor, simplicity, and odd truth of these. Like children's literature should be, these stories never lose their humor or punch. Despite some redundancy with actual myths and some cases of artificially lowering complexity for children and hence growing Beautiful and wonderful. Works of genius by a man who freed himself enough that he could give himself up to that genius instead of trying to make sure that it came out perfectly. As pleasing as his other works are, none I've read can match the joy, humor, simplicity, and odd truth of these. Like children's literature should be, these stories never lose their humor or punch. Despite some redundancy with actual myths and some cases of artificially lowering complexity for children and hence growing transparent, eminently enjoyable.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Loved all the stories, but my personal favorite was about Elephant's Child. Sometimes 'satiable curiosity doesn't kill you; it gets you a very practical appendage with which you can spank your bossy Relatives and hove them into a wasp's nest. And let's face it, O Best Beloved, we've all had that impulse.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    While I didn't love all the messages of these stories, on the whole there were delightful. I loved the illustrations and their explanations and how every story ended with a poem. The writing style was so much fun and is amazing to read aloud. This was such a pleasant surprise!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Larnacouer de SH

    O kadar tatlı ki! 😍

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    These are such fun to read out loud, and I particularly like the descriptions of the illustrations. My favorites are: "How the Whale Got His Throat", featuring the small 'Stute Fish and the mariner of infinite-resource-and-sagacity wearing his suspenders (which you must not forget, Best Beloved). "The Elephant's Child", who was full of 'satiable curiosity and who escapes from the croccodile with the aid of the Bi-Coloured Python Rock Snake on the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yousra Ouail

    Rudyard Kipling was such a racist imperialist colonizer, that was easily shown through his writing without any camouflage. really and that was to be fed to little infants as to teach children falsehood about how animals acquired some of their features. as if animals had to bear their sins and mistakes for the upcoming generation whilst God/nature gave them that specific appearance in order to survive. racism, sexism and too many mischievous elements that can play with children's minds and person Rudyard Kipling was such a racist imperialist colonizer, that was easily shown through his writing without any camouflage. really and that was to be fed to little infants as to teach children falsehood about how animals acquired some of their features. as if animals had to bear their sins and mistakes for the upcoming generation whilst God/nature gave them that specific appearance in order to survive. racism, sexism and too many mischievous elements that can play with children's minds and personalities, regardless of the inaccuracy of the facts this book offers. wouldn't say don't read it because I believe that everybody has his point of view.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    This book is quoted and mentioned so often in other children's classics that I figured I better read it quickly before someone pulled the trump card on me: "Oh, so you review children's books but haven't read 'Just So Stories.' My, my." Of course I don't know of anyone that would do that, but I really did want to read it. I'm glad I did. It is my first book of Kipling's to read and at least with this book, I found his humor delightful. His creativity is both clever and hilarious. At times, thoug This book is quoted and mentioned so often in other children's classics that I figured I better read it quickly before someone pulled the trump card on me: "Oh, so you review children's books but haven't read 'Just So Stories.' My, my." Of course I don't know of anyone that would do that, but I really did want to read it. I'm glad I did. It is my first book of Kipling's to read and at least with this book, I found his humor delightful. His creativity is both clever and hilarious. At times, though, I did find it to be a touch long and drawn out; like a joke that, even though you know where it's headed and think it's funny, takes a smidge too long in getting to the punch. At least I thought so. And I sped through the illustration descriptions as I found them too detailed. With that in mind, these short stories are great. They're all explanations really of how things came to be. The comical versions, that is. The type that you could see a dad replying with when he is putting his child to bed. "Well you see, this is how the rhinoceros got his wrinkly skin ..." Which is actually how these stories came to be - Kipling telling his daughter stories. I particularly liked 'How the Rhinoceros got his Skin' and 'How the First Letter was Written.' And I also got a good chuckle out of Kipling's explanation of how we came to say, "Minding your P's and Q's!" Ages: 7+ Cleanliness: There is genie/fairy tale like magic scattered a few times throughout the book. A man is described as wearing nothing but a hat. "For goodness' sake" is said twice. 'Thank goodness." "My gracious" is said twice. "Negro." "Pooh." Mentions a pipe and tobacco. A folktale story has several gods for characters in it. Mentions a Neolithic man and there's a story about earlier people that lived in caves. "Stupid" and "idiot" are used. An illustration shows a little girl with no clothing - no details. A butterfly tells a lie. **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    That mesmerizing rhythmic bumpity-bump of words, a song (almost), the lure of the storyteller, one extraordinary ordinary thing next to another extraordinary ordinary thing, a line of events unexpected yet just right, silly and serious---that's Just So Stories.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Just so stories Written and Illustrated by Rudyard Kipling The ‘Just So Stories’ are a collection of eccentric myths that Kipling created to tell to his children. There are twelve in total: most of which are fanciful revelations of how certain animals came to possess their distinguishing features. The characters are humorous and archetypal and most of the tales offer some affectionate caution and insight into the consequences of indulging those sinful traits such as sloth, greed and envy. The origi Just so stories Written and Illustrated by Rudyard Kipling The ‘Just So Stories’ are a collection of eccentric myths that Kipling created to tell to his children. There are twelve in total: most of which are fanciful revelations of how certain animals came to possess their distinguishing features. The characters are humorous and archetypal and most of the tales offer some affectionate caution and insight into the consequences of indulging those sinful traits such as sloth, greed and envy. The origins of these stories as a fond father’s mischievous explanations to his children as to how the world came to be just so shine through the tall tales and suggest to me that these are stories that should be read to children rather than by them. Not only should these stories be read aloud but I believe they should be read with absolute conviction and gusto! Rudyard Kipling uses very imaginative descriptions, nonsense language and strong rhythms to control the flow of the reading, making this a challenging read for young children. I would suggest that this might suit a capable reader of seven years or above who did not have a great appetite for long books as each story is quite short and there are many diversions on the way to a rewarding conclusion. These stories would accompany a year 4, 5 or 6 literacy strand on myths very well or any work on descriptive language as it would provide excellent examples of similes, metaphors, alliteration and personification. With their slight moral thread I think they would make also make a great assembly too. A word of warning: I would avoid using the story ‘How the leopard got his spots’ as in addition to explaining the story of the leopard, Kipling also describes how the Ethiopian came to be black rather than white and there are those who might be rightly offended by this invention. My personal favourite is ‘How the Whale got his Throat’ which tells the tale of a greedy Whale who follows the advice of a ‘stute fish and eats ‘one shipwrecked mariner, who, it is only fair to tell you, is a man of infinite-resource-and-sagacity.’ These are absurd and affectionate stories that I believe nurture and support a child’s creative response to the world around them and I can’t wait to read them to my son.

  19. 4 out of 5

    e.c.h.a

    satu kata... KEREEEEEENNNNNNNNNN BANGETTTTTTTTTTT!!! eh itu jadinya dua kata ya hahahaha Setuju banget dah kalau cerita-cerita dalam buku ini bukan Sekadar Cerita. Pokoknya nggak nyesel baca buku ini. Nggak peduli masih anak-anak, remaja, dewasa bahkan kakek-nenek, kisah-kisah fabel yang didongengkan Kipling bener-bener memikat hati. Saya saja senang membacanya, apalagi kalau anak-anak didongengkan dengan cerita-cerita ini, pasti nagih :) Suka dengan ilustrasinya juga, ilustratornya sukses mengint satu kata... KEREEEEEENNNNNNNNNN BANGETTTTTTTTTTT!!! eh itu jadinya dua kata ya hahahaha Setuju banget dah kalau cerita-cerita dalam buku ini bukan Sekadar Cerita. Pokoknya nggak nyesel baca buku ini. Nggak peduli masih anak-anak, remaja, dewasa bahkan kakek-nenek, kisah-kisah fabel yang didongengkan Kipling bener-bener memikat hati. Saya saja senang membacanya, apalagi kalau anak-anak didongengkan dengan cerita-cerita ini, pasti nagih :) Suka dengan ilustrasinya juga, ilustratornya sukses mengintrepretasikan dari mata pembaca nih. Setiap mulai cerita baru, pasti buru-buru pingin lihat ilustrasinya. Love it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Knjigoholičarka

    Ako postoji knjiga koju sam do te mere besomučno čitala kada sam bila dete, da su joj se korice izdrocale u froncle, a tabaci se rasuli i stranice razletele, onda je to ova. Nauči dete iz nje neke korisne stvari, što iz biologije, što iz sociologije - kako je leopard dobio svoje tačke, otkud nosorogu hrapava koža (i zašto je biti ljut isto što i biti bockav), otkud slonu surla, a kitu njegovo ždrelo i kako su smišljena slova za potrebe razonode jedne radoznale musave devojčice. I naravno, shvatil Ako postoji knjiga koju sam do te mere besomučno čitala kada sam bila dete, da su joj se korice izdrocale u froncle, a tabaci se rasuli i stranice razletele, onda je to ova. Nauči dete iz nje neke korisne stvari, što iz biologije, što iz sociologije - kako je leopard dobio svoje tačke, otkud nosorogu hrapava koža (i zašto je biti ljut isto što i biti bockav), otkud slonu surla, a kitu njegovo ždrelo i kako su smišljena slova za potrebe razonode jedne radoznale musave devojčice. I naravno, shvatila sam kako to da mačka stalno ide sama i sva su joj mesta jednaka.

  21. 5 out of 5

    miledi

    Come ha fatto il leopardo ad ottenere le sue macchie? Perché il cammello si è ritrovato con la gobba e l’elefante con la proboscide invece di un semplice naso? Come ebbe origine l’alfabeto? Queste sono solo alcune delle domande importanti a cui viene data una risposta in queste storie bislacche, ricche di fantasia, inventiva e amore. Per non parlare poi delle bellissime illustrazioni che corredano ogni racconto, eseguite da Kipling stesso. Un libro per bambini? Forse sì, ma non solo per loro, per Come ha fatto il leopardo ad ottenere le sue macchie? Perché il cammello si è ritrovato con la gobba e l’elefante con la proboscide invece di un semplice naso? Come ebbe origine l’alfabeto? Queste sono solo alcune delle domande importanti a cui viene data una risposta in queste storie bislacche, ricche di fantasia, inventiva e amore. Per non parlare poi delle bellissime illustrazioni che corredano ogni racconto, eseguite da Kipling stesso. Un libro per bambini? Forse sì, ma non solo per loro, perché tutti abbiamo bisogno di un toccasana per lo spirito. E poi non vorrete perdervi l’occasione di conoscere “il gatto che se ne andava da solo”, vero? … Ma voi siete matti!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Zaz

    A nice batch of short stories around animals. At a scientific level, most of the origin stories were horrific, I always have mixed feelings about these kinds of things, some young kids could think they are true. At a fantasy level, the stories were nice with animals, morals, powerful gods, etc. I think I enjoyed the most the one about the crab (especially the last lines) et the one with the cat, the others didn't really grab my attention.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emilie Emzbooksandco

    I loved reading these little stories! They were really cute, and eventhough I liked some way more than others, I really enjoyed my reading!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    More like Just So-So Stories. I didn't care for this book much. I was expecting stories instead of this is how this animal got this trait (forget the actual name for those books).

  25. 4 out of 5

    NeDa

    Взех книгата от библиотеката, защото ми беше интересен новия превод на Галина Златина ( която в книгата е посочена като Злантина). Предговора на Андрей Захариев към книгата, "разработена специално за младите читатели" и част от поредица, където "по-старите текстове са изчистени от най-неразбираемите думи и изрази" започва така: ""Проповедник и пропагандатор на британския империализъм" - това за думи на Джордж Оруел, великият британски писател, журналист и есеист. Как мислите, към кого е отнесено т Взех книгата от библиотеката, защото ми беше интересен новия превод на Галина Златина ( която в книгата е посочена като Злантина). Предговора на Андрей Захариев към книгата, "разработена специално за младите читатели" и част от поредица, където "по-старите текстове са изчистени от най-неразбираемите думи и изрази" започва така: ""Проповедник и пропагандатор на британския империализъм" - това за думи на Джордж Оруел, великият британски писател, журналист и есеист. Как мислите, към кого е отнесено това сурово обвинение? .... " По-нататък в предговора се говори за "лапидарни" и "дорийски" изречения, като значението на думите е посочено в скоби. От приказките, успях да прочета само няколко страници ... И стиховете липсват. Ще си чета старите издания и преводи, дано младите читатели се справят по-успешно от мен. Началото на предговора на Валери Петров към издание от 1980г. : "Малки читатели ... ето ви още една книжка с приказки за животни. Написал я е преди точно 74 години английският писател Ръдиърд Киплинг. Той обичал много да пътува и в книгите си разказва за живота в Индия, Африка и други далечни части на света."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hana

    An all time favorite. It begs to be read alive for the rhythm and poetry and the marvelous word-play. If you have no children to read it to it's time to volunteer at your library! I'm hard-pressed to pick a favorite story, but I'll go with the Elephant's Child because like him my besetting sin is insatiable curiosity. I love the part about the 'Great grey green greasy Limpopo River all set about with fever trees..." but I've also learned enough about crocodiles to avoid putting my nose in danger An all time favorite. It begs to be read alive for the rhythm and poetry and the marvelous word-play. If you have no children to read it to it's time to volunteer at your library! I'm hard-pressed to pick a favorite story, but I'll go with the Elephant's Child because like him my besetting sin is insatiable curiosity. I love the part about the 'Great grey green greasy Limpopo River all set about with fever trees..." but I've also learned enough about crocodiles to avoid putting my nose in danger :D I confess I like to read the stories aloud to my cats when younger relatives are unavailable. The cat family particularly likes the one that goes "I am the cat that walks by himself and all places are alike to me." But, as my GR friends already know, I suspect that's only because the sentence has cat in it. They, themselves, the cats, are entirely conservative, particular and demanding about places and people

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tweedledum

    How the elephant got his trunk was one of my favourite bedtime stories as a child and I was fortunate in having a parent who never tired of reading it. "The great grey greasy Limpopo river all set about with fever trees " created one of my earliest images of Afica and filled me with longing to visit. Kipling was a master storyteller who knew exactly how to capture a child's imagination. As the elephant makes his leisurely way in search of the crocodile, leaving his grumpy and incurious relatives How the elephant got his trunk was one of my favourite bedtime stories as a child and I was fortunate in having a parent who never tired of reading it. "The great grey greasy Limpopo river all set about with fever trees " created one of my earliest images of Afica and filled me with longing to visit. Kipling was a master storyteller who knew exactly how to capture a child's imagination. As the elephant makes his leisurely way in search of the crocodile, leaving his grumpy and incurious relatives behind We learn that although naiveity may put one at risk still experiences that seem bad can be turned around and unexpected friends may appear along the way.

  28. 4 out of 5

    pierlapo quimby

    Queste storie sono proprio così, inutile domandarsi il perché di questo o il perché di quello, è questione di autorevolezza del narratore, la stessa inossidabile autorevolezza di cui si serve il genitore quando, nel raccontare alla figlioletta la favola più incredibile spacciandola per realmente accaduta, assume quel finto cipiglio serioso che soffoca sul nascere ogni possibile eccezione di inverosimiglianza.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Love the edition illustrated by Helen Ward. Only complaint? Not enough pictures! But the stories themselves are still fun to read, O Best Beloved. If there are traces of the imperialism that makes Kipling's other works problematic, I don't see them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I cannot speak highly enough about these stories. I have been reading them to my kids since they were 3 years old and they never get tired of them. The language is rich and beautiful and a blast to read out loud. This book is an absolute must for your personal library.

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