kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Tales from the Inner City

Availability: Ready to download

TALES FROM THE INNER CITY is a collection of incredibly original stories, rich with feeling, strangely moving, almost numinous. And when the reader comes to the artwork, it's like walking into an amazing room, and then throwing open a curtain to see a brilliant scene that makes you understand and appreciate everything you've encountered in a deeper way.


Compare
kode adsense disini

TALES FROM THE INNER CITY is a collection of incredibly original stories, rich with feeling, strangely moving, almost numinous. And when the reader comes to the artwork, it's like walking into an amazing room, and then throwing open a curtain to see a brilliant scene that makes you understand and appreciate everything you've encountered in a deeper way.

30 review for Tales from the Inner City

  1. 4 out of 5

    T.D. Whittle

    'Your money is meaningless to us,' said the bears. 'You grasp economics with the same clawless paws you use for fumbling justice.' And, once again, the bears showed us. There they were, God help us, the Ledgers of the Earth, written in clouds and glaciers and sediments, tallied in the colours of the sun and the moon as light passed through the millennial sap of every living thing, and we looked upon it all with dread. Ours was not the only fiscal system in the world, it turned out. And worse, our 'Your money is meaningless to us,' said the bears. 'You grasp economics with the same clawless paws you use for fumbling justice.' And, once again, the bears showed us. There they were, God help us, the Ledgers of the Earth, written in clouds and glaciers and sediments, tallied in the colours of the sun and the moon as light passed through the millennial sap of every living thing, and we looked upon it all with dread. Ours was not the only fiscal system in the world, it turned out. And worse, our debt was severe beyond reckoning. And worse than worse, all the capital we had accrued throughout history was a collective figment of the human imagination: every asset, stock and dollar. We owned nothing. The bears asked us to relinquish our hold on all that never belonged to us in the first place. Well, this we simply could not do. So we shot the bears. Never fear, gentle reader, for while we cannot resurrect the bears, the cows will surely avenge their deaths. I have been following Shaun Tan's work for years now, and was exceptionally happy to attend a talk he gave at a Melbourne bookshop around the time The Bird King was published. This one is my favourite of his works so far, though I love quite a few of them, including the aforementioned Bird King. In the Author Notes Tan released about Tales From The Inner City, he opens with this statement: Tales from the Inner City, a sister volume to my anthology Tales from Outer Suburbia (2008), is a collection of 25 illustrated stories about relationships between humans and animals. The basic premise I set for myself was quite simple: think about an animal in a city. Why is it there? How do people react to it? What meaning does it suggest? The first story I wrote concerned crocodiles living across the entire upper floor of a skyscraper, and this triggered a flow of similar daydreams. (See Allen & Unwin Book Publishers link to download Commentary by Shaun Tan.) This type of artistic process fascinates me, which is probably why I love authors such as Murakami, too, who says he writes in the early mornings before he's fully awake because that's when his subconscious is still tossing up interesting ideas (that's my paraphrasing, not what he actually said). Like Murakami, Tan's books are shot through with images that evoke something powerful in us, through pictures and words, yet they are both elusive and ephemeral. We feel constantly that we are on the brink of grasping something important, which we may lose upon wakening. Tan also had this to say in his notes: What I love about speculative fiction is the way it can address commonplace problems in unusual, hypothetical ways. He offers us a series of poetic and thoughtful illustrated vignettes in Tales From The Inner City , with each story spinning off one of his unusual hypotheticals. The results are stunning. Importantly, my animals never really speak, and their animal natures remain inscrutable. They are beings that move in and out of each story as if trying to tell us something about our own successes and failures as a species, the meaning of our dreams, and our true place in the world . . . (See Allen & Unwin Book Publishers link to download Commentary by Shaun Tan.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell Leaning

    Quite dreamlike and surreal. The advanced reader's copy we received at the bookstore had only a handful of stories, however they were unique and intriguing and the illustrations were phenomenal. I look forward to getting a chance to read the full thing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Another great book by Shaun Tan! This time focusing on the relationship between humans and animals, with amazing artwork to go along with the short stories. Some of my favorites were: Crocodile, Dog, Cat, Bear, Owl, and Rhinoceros.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    Wow, what a gorgeous books. Review TK for Kidsreads or Teenreads.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jürgen Peeters

    Mijn recensie van 'Verhalen uit de binnenstad' verscheen op 'Tzum' https://www.tzum.info/2018/09/recensi...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katy Wineke

    Preview chapters only. Beautiful, can’t wait to see the rest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book is peculiar, intelligent and beautiful all in one. It consists of a number of different short tales, each from a different perspective and featuring a different animal, and issue, in each. There are absolutely stunning illustrations throughout, sometimes pages at a time - this method of showing rather than telling really worked for me - which accompany each story. Some of the illustrations are eerie, dark and telling while others are really beautiful and full of colour; the illustratio This book is peculiar, intelligent and beautiful all in one. It consists of a number of different short tales, each from a different perspective and featuring a different animal, and issue, in each. There are absolutely stunning illustrations throughout, sometimes pages at a time - this method of showing rather than telling really worked for me - which accompany each story. Some of the illustrations are eerie, dark and telling while others are really beautiful and full of colour; the illustrations are so fantastic that this book could have had no text whatsoever and still I would have understood the message. Some of the stories are particularly dark - for example one story featuring a pig was so troubling that I had to have a break before continuing. The message was loud: we as humans often fall into the habit of shutting the door, closing our eyes and ignoring the problem (particularly when it comes to animals and the meat industry) because if we can't see the suffering, pain or understanding of the animal then did it really happen? There are a handful of stories with similarly dark but important messages at the forefront. However, other stories are cleverly witty and light-hearted (although perhaps this is open to interpretation) - a story about a cat who has many homes really touched me. It was both sad and warm, which is not easy to capture in only a few pages. I'm sure my cat has at least three other houses he lives in! This is a peculiar book in places though. A number of the stories are so abstract or erratic that they can feel odd, silly or just difficult to understand what the key message was for. Equally, I don't think there always needs to be a message behind a story, although I really appreciate what the author has tried to do here and I hope more people listen. I guess that's the thing about this book that really works - if you're open to interpreting the hidden , or not so hidden, meanings and choose to see what the author wants you to appreciate then I think this book has the potential to change opinions and make improvements to, at the very least, fundamental opinions on animals and respecting the world we live in. ARC provided free from the publishers in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    The first hint that you're in for something completely whimsical and magical in TALES FROM THE INNER CITY is the wondrous illustration on the cover. Inexplicably, a young boy is holding a large glowing fish. It's eye-catching and enticing and a perfect first glimpse at a really incredible book. TALES FROM THE INNER CITY by Shaun Tan is a masterpiece of poetic language, colorful drawings and heartbreaking stories. Each separate piece is centered on a surreal animal, mammal or insect --- a vignette The first hint that you're in for something completely whimsical and magical in TALES FROM THE INNER CITY is the wondrous illustration on the cover. Inexplicably, a young boy is holding a large glowing fish. It's eye-catching and enticing and a perfect first glimpse at a really incredible book. TALES FROM THE INNER CITY by Shaun Tan is a masterpiece of poetic language, colorful drawings and heartbreaking stories. Each separate piece is centered on a surreal animal, mammal or insect --- a vignette of sorts that introduces readers to the animal in a new way, usually about a kind of havoc the animal is wreaking or the kind of havoc humans are wreaking upon them. Every line seems so well thought out that the rhythm and cadence or each phrase is like the movements of the animals themselves --- hoof beats and flutters of wings, prowling on light paws and swishing of fish through the air (yes, the air). My favorite selection, a poem, actually is one that I wish could be framed and read over and over again to every dog and animal lover I know or meet. It’s about the relationship between humans and dogs told in small verses of a poem on various pages with beautiful images to accompany it. And like the pieces that come before and after it, it is exceptional and unique, making the connection between humans and animals in a slightly lopsided way. The illustrations too can almost be enjoyed separately without the accompanying narratives but even so, invite awe and wonder with the detail and use of color. Shaun Tan is very talented and this volume boasts of it. It's hard to tell the age range --- I think that as a young adult I appreciate it fully but I think this could be shared in classrooms and engender discussions in art courses and storytelling courses. It showcases the best of writing --- of emotional narratives that pack a punch and leave you breathless for the short time it takes you to devour each work. The stories are short enough to read in an afternoon but I think you should savor them, picking your way through the prose and poems and taking time to enjoy each piece of art. I can't wait to see the inevitable flurry of awards this book will get because it is simply too gorgeous not to acknowledge. Go pick it up yourself and enjoy it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    I loved author/illustrator Shaun Tan's short story collection, Tales from Outer Suburbia. It was weird and whimsical and as oddly satisfying as taking a small, hesitant taste of a strange new food (like starfruit or kimchi) and discovering it's delicious beyond what you have words to describe. So when I learned a brand new collection, Tales from the Inner City, was out, I was beyond excited and couldn't wait to get my hands on it. Tales from the Inner City is one of those rare (make that RARE) o I loved author/illustrator Shaun Tan's short story collection, Tales from Outer Suburbia. It was weird and whimsical and as oddly satisfying as taking a small, hesitant taste of a strange new food (like starfruit or kimchi) and discovering it's delicious beyond what you have words to describe. So when I learned a brand new collection, Tales from the Inner City, was out, I was beyond excited and couldn't wait to get my hands on it. Tales from the Inner City is one of those rare (make that RARE) occasions where a book lives up to its hype. Surpasses it, even. Tan creates a world where wild horses and rhinos roam the city's highways, where magical fish swim through the nighttime sky, and a where very special cat brings together a neighborhood of people who would otherwise have remained strangers. Here, a tiger stalks anyone not clever enough to wear a mask on the back of their head, a mischievous nighttime fox runs amok in your home--but restores everything by dawn, and a child prodigy dreams of only one thing (and it isn't what you'd think). There't more. Much more. But too much to cover in a single review. Tales from the Inner City was almost as wonderful as Tales from Outer Suburbia. Like those from its predecessor, the stories in Tales from the Inner City are not the sort of short story you read and forget. These are the sort that stick with you long after you've read them and returned the book to its proper place on the shelf. They are the sort you find yourself thinking about at odd times. They are commentaries about us and our world, but never in a way that's preachy or political or in your face. But they DO make you think. And the accompanying artwork is beautiful! To sum it up: This book is incredible in too many ways to count. I loved it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Darby Hudson

    So excited to get my paws on this. The first thing I thought on finishing it was The Mysteries of Harris Burdick by Chris Van Allensburg (and his animal centric Jumanji). Wasn't sure to 4 or 5 this. The balance of assured and sometimes beautiful prose (and poetry) with out-of-this-world illustration sometimes works, sometimes distracts. His visuals are so complete yet mysterious on their own, I sometimes found myself niggled by the impurity of narrative forced on the illustration. The art work is So excited to get my paws on this. The first thing I thought on finishing it was The Mysteries of Harris Burdick by Chris Van Allensburg (and his animal centric Jumanji). Wasn't sure to 4 or 5 this. The balance of assured and sometimes beautiful prose (and poetry) with out-of-this-world illustration sometimes works, sometimes distracts. His visuals are so complete yet mysterious on their own, I sometimes found myself niggled by the impurity of narrative forced on the illustration. The art work is so strong it may have been nice to leave some of it finger-printless and in it's own perfect silence - just letting the air pass through... But I'm just being super picky. And not to completely contradict myself here, there is a stunning story, the longest in the collection, which accompanies the book's front cover picture. It's worth the price of the book alone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    A delightful jewel of a book - short stories of animals and our human relationships (or not) with them. Difficult to review as I have never encountered writing and illustrating like this before. A beautiful (and quick) read. The art is exquisite.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Greg Wilson

    Undeniably genius.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Justin Green

    Absolutely awesome

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

    my favourite stories = lungfish & bears with lawyers

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Reviewing for professional magazine, see review (you won't want to miss it) there!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Portal in the Pages

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Marchingo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Neva

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sally Yuen

  22. 5 out of 5

    M

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shane Symonds

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stef (Noveltea Corner)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  28. 5 out of 5

    Summer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Rosa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.