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The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern all of existence, and now the godlike beings who embody them have awakened. All life is in jeopardy, and the only chance the superheroes of Earth have to stop the unthinkable lies in new alliances...the likes of which have never been seen before! Superman, Starfire and Martian Manhunter search for the secrets of the cosmos in Team Mystery! Batman, Beast Boy and Deathstroke battle chaos itself as Team Entropy! Wonder Woman, Zatanna and Etrigan the Demon unlock bizarre alien technologies with Team Wonder! And the Flash, Cyborg and Harley Quinn learn the astonishing truths of Team Wisdom! Can these amazing new Justice Leagues stick together to stop universal annihilation? Some heroes will not live long enough to find out... Collects issues #1-4 and stories from DC Nation #0.


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The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern The creative team of Scott Snyder, Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul unleash new super-teams in Justice League: No Justice. The events of Dark Nights: Metal have transformed the universe in ways both wonderful and terrifying...and unleashed four ancient entities with the power to destroy it all. Mystery. Wonder. Wisdom. Entropy. These four forces govern all of existence, and now the godlike beings who embody them have awakened. All life is in jeopardy, and the only chance the superheroes of Earth have to stop the unthinkable lies in new alliances...the likes of which have never been seen before! Superman, Starfire and Martian Manhunter search for the secrets of the cosmos in Team Mystery! Batman, Beast Boy and Deathstroke battle chaos itself as Team Entropy! Wonder Woman, Zatanna and Etrigan the Demon unlock bizarre alien technologies with Team Wonder! And the Flash, Cyborg and Harley Quinn learn the astonishing truths of Team Wisdom! Can these amazing new Justice Leagues stick together to stop universal annihilation? Some heroes will not live long enough to find out... Collects issues #1-4 and stories from DC Nation #0.

30 review for Justice League: No Justice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    For some reason mystery, wonder, wisdom, and entropy are manifested as titans who want to crush planets. Guess what the Justice League have to do? That’s right, say it with me: punch dem. Yaaaawn. Yep, it’s another impossibly bad Justice League book! If you thought Dark Nights: Metal was Scott Snyder’s lowest ebb, think again - the dude somehow found an even lower level of quality in No Justice! Snyder heads up a team of hacks who’ve come up with one of the blandest superhero stories ever, even For some reason mystery, wonder, wisdom, and entropy are manifested as titans who want to crush planets. Guess what the Justice League have to do? That’s right, say it with me: punch dem. Yaaaawn. Yep, it’s another impossibly bad Justice League book! If you thought Dark Nights: Metal was Scott Snyder’s lowest ebb, think again - the dude somehow found an even lower level of quality in No Justice! Snyder heads up a team of hacks who’ve come up with one of the blandest superhero stories ever, even by bland superhero stories standards. It amounts to emptying out a toybox of every DC character ever, arbitrarily sorting them into teams and throwing them at some disposable villains of the week. And it’s so tense that somehow the characters conveniently have the time to change into team-specific coloured uniforms before going off to hit their assigned baddie! It’s even more boring to read than you might expect from something so unimaginative and one-note. I don’t expect anyone besides the most rabid of DC fanboys enjoying this colostomy bag of a comic. It’s an obvious pun but it’s true: No Justice is no good.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    2.5 stars On paper, Justice League: No Justice is a really fun and cool cosmic JL adventure that pushes the boundaries of the known DC universe. It's very much in the spirit of Grant Morrison's stuff like JLA and Final Crisis, it introduces some crazy concepts and does fun things with the team rosters to pair world's finest heroes with their worst nemeses in order to save not just our world, but thousands of others. Nothing too deep, mind you — it's still your typical blockbuster superhero comic 2.5 stars On paper, Justice League: No Justice is a really fun and cool cosmic JL adventure that pushes the boundaries of the known DC universe. It's very much in the spirit of Grant Morrison's stuff like JLA and Final Crisis, it introduces some crazy concepts and does fun things with the team rosters to pair world's finest heroes with their worst nemeses in order to save not just our world, but thousands of others. Nothing too deep, mind you — it's still your typical blockbuster superhero comic book, but it definitely had the potential to be a super entertaining read. Unfortuantely, No Justice is bogged down by some seriously clunky writing. The book is only four issues long, and yet it took me about the same amount of time to read it that I normally spend on comics that are 10-12 issues long! Why? Because every single panel on every single page is absolutely crammed with words. I don't know what it is with Scott Snyder and James Tynion (Joshua Williamson's writing has always been like this, so no surprises here), but these guys absolutely forgot about the simple "show, don't tell" rule of visual storytelling. Every single concept and every single plot point had to be thoroughly explained by one of the characters, which completely killed the momentum of the entire book. You have to get through pages upon pages of tedious exposition just to realise that this is actually a very simple story. Where the book doesn't disappoint is the artwork by Francis Manapul, Marcus To and Riley Rossmo. No Justice looks absolutely fantastic and depicts this huge, off the chain cosmic showdown in all its glory. It's just a shame that most of it was covered by excessive text balloons... As a result, Justice League: No Justice was only okay. To be fair, I expected something much worse from this story after that underwhelming preview in DC Nation #0, but it turned out to be a tolerable read that sadly could have been that much better if the writers could restrain themselves and the editors did their job a bit better. I didn't hate it though, and I am really curious to see what's coming next in the three new Justice League series that follow this event.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Choppy, messy, bombastic mess of a book. World: The art is beautiful, there are ups and downs to it but when Manapul is the artist there is a sense of grandeur that few DC books have, this is where Manapul is at his best. The world building here is the best thing about this series. The building of the pieces from the past and the changing of the status quo for the future is the best part. The heroes and villains we see together, the calls to the cosmic, the source wall, the Outsiders and new thin Choppy, messy, bombastic mess of a book. World: The art is beautiful, there are ups and downs to it but when Manapul is the artist there is a sense of grandeur that few DC books have, this is where Manapul is at his best. The world building here is the best thing about this series. The building of the pieces from the past and the changing of the status quo for the future is the best part. The heroes and villains we see together, the calls to the cosmic, the source wall, the Outsiders and new things altogether, this world is great. The idea of the Omega Titans was a bit wishy washy and the large cast didn’t’ allow for them to be developed but overall the world is so much more interesting now for the DCU. Story: A choppy, messy and convoluted story that ends in a great place for the DCU. The idea of the 4 teams was great, the end was great, everything in between was honestly draggy and the cast too big for the four issue run. I liked the idea of the teams and the dynamics, chemistry and banter it would allow but just like any Justice League book there are far too many action sequences and far too little time for characters to interact. There are so many big things happening at the same time and the logic and the world building can’t keep up with the action that the story just gets jumbled into a mess. There are huge ideas that Snyder is trying to do and new status quos he’s trying to set and once again with the 4 issues it was janky as all hell. I did liked how the book ended with the promise of New Justice and the multiple teams but the villain did not pan out and the story was just a mess. I will say that the tie in with Green Arrow was also rather ho hum and zzz… Characters: There are so many characters that I won’t get into each and every one of them. As with all event book there are those that are just panel candy and Deathstroke and Harley are absolutely that, so are a lot of them in fact. The cast was huge but not in a good way. That’s what happens in event and team books, but oh well. There was some character moments but most of them were unearned and a lot of them just happened for the sake of the story. J’onn being leader makes sense to DC fans but not to new readers. I liked it but I also felt this was much like many events bloated and tried to do too much with too many characters and too few issues. The status quo change is good but how we reached it left a lot to be desired. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    No Justice is...well no fun. I want to love this. A HUGE cast of characters are all brought in by Brainiac as he tells him trouble is coming. Something bigger than they ever faced. So he splits them into teams that he believes will work best together to take these god like destroyers down. From there we have a bunch of groups of Justice League working together to stop the destroyers. So...basically Metal 2.0. Good: I enjoy the art a lot for the most part. Some great shots and cool fighting momen No Justice is...well no fun. I want to love this. A HUGE cast of characters are all brought in by Brainiac as he tells him trouble is coming. Something bigger than they ever faced. So he splits them into teams that he believes will work best together to take these god like destroyers down. From there we have a bunch of groups of Justice League working together to stop the destroyers. So...basically Metal 2.0. Good: I enjoy the art a lot for the most part. Some great shots and cool fighting moments. I also thought Damien was pretty great here. Bad: It felt really convoluted, heavy exposition once again, and just a messy event like comic. Sure, way shorter and more condensed then Metal but just as confusing at times. The ending didn't get me very excited. So yeah, another small event that didn't work for me. Just like Metal this one didn't do much for me. A 2 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai

    Fast Paced...no filler...just balls to the wall. A perfect, cosmic, bridge-mini-series from Metal into the new Justice League titles.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    The best trait of No Justice is that Snyder has told the story in a modular fashion, an effective way to avoid a possible convoluted mess of plot, exposition and the sheer volume of characters while still maintaining its focus on what has to be done, even though there are still many parts of the story that I believe may still be improved. The art on the other hand is great. Whatever Manapul draws, I admire. This is definitely not one of the better stories of Scott Snyder. Perhaps DC Comics is squ The best trait of No Justice is that Snyder has told the story in a modular fashion, an effective way to avoid a possible convoluted mess of plot, exposition and the sheer volume of characters while still maintaining its focus on what has to be done, even though there are still many parts of the story that I believe may still be improved. The art on the other hand is great. Whatever Manapul draws, I admire. This is definitely not one of the better stories of Scott Snyder. Perhaps DC Comics is squeezing him way more than he could handle. No Justice severely impeded what the Omega Titans could have possibly done, their power, making these primordial beings conveniently dumb to fit in the story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    A very underwhelming follow-up to a very mediocre event ("Metal"). This was a hot dumpster fire from start to finish. How is it that an epic concept like this gets FOUR ISSUES, while other, lesser premises get 6, 8 or even 12 issues?) This felt like a rush job: there wasn't enough time to flesh out the plot, or the teams involved, and felt rushed from the opening page.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    So overly convoluted. Way too much going on and too dialogue heavy. I haven't really liked this new direction DC has taken with the Metals with Snyder. Dissapointed so far

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

    Realmente sólo he leído las dos primeras entregas, pero no voy a seguir y eso penaliza mucho. El primer episodio no está mal: dibujo estupendo y mucho colorín, algún giro intrigante, sale mi adorada Amanda Waller (y obesa y cuarentona, no la modelo del New 52)...Pero llega el capítulo 2...Todo conceptos muy vagos, más grandes que la vida y narrados de forma confusa; pero para darse de tortas a los supers ya les va bien.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Much like the DMV, it’s bright, boring, and I wasted way too much time. The mythology is interesting but the pacing is glue. And jesus, how many times will there be an apocalypse and a destroyer?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the aftermath of DC’s cosmic event Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder moves on to taking over the Justice League series by first introducing readers to a new cosmic threat in Justice League: No Justice. Having easily distinguished himself among the many writers at DC Comics and proving his incredible creativity and masterful story-telling talents throughout his New 52 Batman series, his plans on pushing the universe a step further into t You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the aftermath of DC’s cosmic event Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder moves on to taking over the Justice League series by first introducing readers to a new cosmic threat in Justice League: No Justice. Having easily distinguished himself among the many writers at DC Comics and proving his incredible creativity and masterful story-telling talents throughout his New 52 Batman series, his plans on pushing the universe a step further into the darkness continues by taking on one of the most important teams in superhero history. With Justice League: No Justice, Scott Snyder teams up with a phenomenal creative team consisted of Joshua Williamson, James Tynion IV and Francis Manapul to offer fans a bridge towards bigger threats, and forces that have never been introduced before. Collecting issues #1-4, as well as a preview teaser from DC Nation #0, this story arc assures fans that it plans on destroying the status quo. Picking up where things were left off during the grandiose and insane Metal event, heroes find out that the consequences of their actions had repercussions, but this time around the effects go beyond Earth and as deep into the universe as possible. The arrival of four ancient entities whose hunger extends beyond humans and creatures, but rather planets, clearly sets the table at the scope of this new danger that Earth’s heroes are now going to have to face. But to overcome this new challenge, new alliances need to be forged and these alliances do not limit our heroes to those who only sought good in the world. In fact, among these villains who lend a helping hand, one of them has a plan, and it is not going to be an easy one to follow. As short as this story arc might be, it was extremely concise, yet incredibly explosive. There was a desire to introduce a whole new element to the DC lore while leaving enough mysteries for fans to ruminate on. After all, the intention was to shake things up for the Justice League and have a whole new foundation on which Scott Snyder can work on during his Justice League run. By introducing these new godlike beings into this universe, he gives himself this window of opportunity during which he can introduce and reintroduce all kinds of characters, and give them a voice behind which they can firmly build their own stories in the future. The underlying structure to the story is pretty simple and easy to follow making it a bit less exciting, but when you understand the intention behind the story, you find yourself wondering what kind of doors Scott Snyder plans on opening next, and that’s absolutely thrilling. The first two issues’ artwork are truly sensational thanks to Francis Manapul’s style. Known especially for this work on the New 52 The Flash series, I have rarely ever found his work to be difficult to appreciate, especially when he finds really interesting approaches to structure the way you read the story. Instead of standard square panels read from left to red, row after row, he finds creative ways to integrate a general theme to a two-page full page panel and makes you explore and appreciate the story differently. It does merit mentioning that some of his designs for female heroes, like Wonder Woman and her visage, looked odd, but nothing detrimental. Nothing as detrimental as the artwork we’re thrown into in the third issue where Riley Rossmo takes over at least. In all honesty, I could never stand his artwork style, and it was no exception here. It sometimes could get as bad as some of Frank Miller’s late-career stuff. Yes. That bad. At least the final issue in this volume, the very story from DC Nation #0 was eye-candy. Jorge Jimenez is a man who knows how to draw and there’s simply no way you could skim through his stuff. The details are exquisite! Justice League: No Justice is a wonderful story arc that serves as a transition to Scott Snyder’s Justice League run, and an excellent teaser to what’s to come. If you thought the multiverse was complicated, expect things to get even bigger. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Pretty fun bridge between Metal and Snyders Justice League series. Bit over convoluted at times given the amount of characters and the fact that Snyder loves his text in comics. But the Manapul art is amazing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Justice League: No Justice shows the impact of the dark multiverse is continuing. After the wall was opened up between the multiverse and the dark multiverse in Dark Nights: Metal, a new evil is unleashed upon the galaxy. The four Omega Titans each represent one of the fundamental energies of sentient life: entropy, wisdom, wonder and mystery. When Wisdom attacks Brainiac’s home planet, Brainiac brings together all the galaxy’s heroes, villains and monsters to fight together using his sophisticat Justice League: No Justice shows the impact of the dark multiverse is continuing. After the wall was opened up between the multiverse and the dark multiverse in Dark Nights: Metal, a new evil is unleashed upon the galaxy. The four Omega Titans each represent one of the fundamental energies of sentient life: entropy, wisdom, wonder and mystery. When Wisdom attacks Brainiac’s home planet, Brainiac brings together all the galaxy’s heroes, villains and monsters to fight together using his sophisticated plan. Brainiac is unable to explain his plan fully when tragedy strikes him—leaving the new team forced to fight the Omega Titans on their own. It’s great to see all the gang working together against a common enemy. Also, the plot forces entities that usually rely on their brawn to start using their brain. The art is beautiful as usual but the plot is the star here. Since I love a good plot, 5 stars! Highly recommended for all superhero comic fans. I can’t wait for the next episode. Thanks to the publisher, DC Comics, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    Another shitload of typical Snyderish garbage. With wonderful art, though. Not as terrible as Metal, but it's still pure trash.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zaheer Alam

    beautiful art + amazing story = masterpiece.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] In the wake of Dark Nights: Metal, the Source Wall that surrounds the multiverse lies broken, and new threats from beyond the wall have set their sights on our dimension. When Brainiac arrives on Earth with news of the Omega Titans, four enormous beings that feed on the universal constants of Mystery, Entropy, Wisdom, and Wonder, heroes and villains alike must unite to save Brainiac’s homeworld, before they turn their attention to Earth. You’ve got to hand it to Scott Snyde [Read as single issues] In the wake of Dark Nights: Metal, the Source Wall that surrounds the multiverse lies broken, and new threats from beyond the wall have set their sights on our dimension. When Brainiac arrives on Earth with news of the Omega Titans, four enormous beings that feed on the universal constants of Mystery, Entropy, Wisdom, and Wonder, heroes and villains alike must unite to save Brainiac’s homeworld, before they turn their attention to Earth. You’ve got to hand it to Scott Snyder – he hears the phrase ‘go big or go home’ and doesn’t even wait for the end before he’s out making the most noise and blowing up the most stuff as possible. After Dark Nights: Metal, you’d think he’d take a breather for five minutes, but instead he launches the entire DC Universe into another massive story featuring almost all of your favourite heroes and villains united against a common threat, and with it shaping the landscape of the DCU and the next batch of upcoming stories along with it. No Justice is full throttle from the first page, and then we hit the ground running and don’t stop until the last page of issue four. Despite the huge amount of characters involved, Snyder manages to set up the story, explain the background, and drive everything to a satisfying conclusion without stumbling at all; he’s well practised at this kind of thing at this point, but it’s still fun to watch him work. He even manages to set up a subplot involving Amanda Waller and Green Arrow that pays off in his own book without batting an eyelid. The driving force behind No Justice feels a bit Mcguffin-y, but it opens up a lot of avenues for exploration after the series concludes and the New Justice line launches. The team-ups between characters are unexpected, but Snyder manages to use all of the disparate characters to his advantage, even if it’s just for one or two scenes across the four issues. There are even some breakouts you’d never expect – read issue 3, and tell me that Starro isn’t one of your favourite characters now, I dare you. Again, this also acts as a springboard for new stories; no one that survives this story comes out of it unchanged – they either know something or have become something different which will inform them going forward. Of course, the artwork isn’t too shabby either. With Francis Manapul on the first, second, and fourth issues, the visuals could not be better. Manapul’s one of my favourite artists, and he turns out some beautiful work here. He’s assisted in the second issue by Marcus To, while To and Riley Rossmo team up for the third issue. Rossmo’s a bit too pointy in style to fit in with Manapul’s smooth lines, but he and To make a decent combination, and help with the more busy panels of the middle issues, leaving Manapul free to let loose where appropriate with some gorgeous splash pages or wide panels. No Justice is another home run for Scott Snyder and friends. It’s fast paced, full of action, full of heart, and a rollercoaster ride from the first page to the last with superb artwork from one of the industry’s best; if this is the set-up for what’s to come next, New Justice is going to be a golden age for DC.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Just when I was giving props to Snyder for the generally decent All-Star Batman Vol. 3, I read this rehashed, confusing and boring story. A sort-of sequel to Dark Metal, the heroes have to deal with the ramifications of that crossover in which they've unleashed some Marvel Celestial-like beings. These things somehow/why want to eat? a seed? buried in Earth? Sounds very similar to Marvel's Earth-X story. The rest is standard: grab as many heroes as you can, mix them up so they don't get along and Just when I was giving props to Snyder for the generally decent All-Star Batman Vol. 3, I read this rehashed, confusing and boring story. A sort-of sequel to Dark Metal, the heroes have to deal with the ramifications of that crossover in which they've unleashed some Marvel Celestial-like beings. These things somehow/why want to eat? a seed? buried in Earth? Sounds very similar to Marvel's Earth-X story. The rest is standard: grab as many heroes as you can, mix them up so they don't get along and fight among themselves, yet still somehow come together to save the world/universe. There's waving of the hands when it comes to the how they actually accomplish this, but hey it's an epic crossover! Who cares? I know I don't.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    These four issues have so many flaws, but the strange thing is that I enjoyed this more than the recent Avengers mega story from Marvel (which is so memorable that I can't even recall the event's name). Building off of what he did in Metal, and using a principle Jack Kirby created nearly 50 years ago in The New Gods, Snyder takes the hole in the Source Wall to give us a Big Threat (actually cue Kirby again see: The Eternals-if you're going to borrow, borrow from the best). These four giant elder These four issues have so many flaws, but the strange thing is that I enjoyed this more than the recent Avengers mega story from Marvel (which is so memorable that I can't even recall the event's name). Building off of what he did in Metal, and using a principle Jack Kirby created nearly 50 years ago in The New Gods, Snyder takes the hole in the Source Wall to give us a Big Threat (actually cue Kirby again see: The Eternals-if you're going to borrow, borrow from the best). These four giant elder beings are coming to judge worlds and eat them while they're at it. All right that might be an over simplification of the plot, but the pacing is pretty much pedal to the metal. Characterization, we don't need no stinking characterization. Reason for heroes and villains to team-up, ah we'll go with one so far out there no one will pay much attention to it. Its sort of fun, and the art holds up. The characters stay true to form, and points to Snyder to throwing some items in there that will be popping up in DC titles in the next year (my guess).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: Brainiac kidnaps a bunch of heroes and villains to deal with a threat to the planet Colu. Of course there is more to it than that. Honestly, since I haven't read the Metal books, I was more than a little confused. The story felt disjointed and the art was very inconsistent. I can tell that the story is giving important info for the story to come, but still, there were issues left unaddressed, which was frustrating. It wasn't awful, but there were holes and gaps that needed filling.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I received a copy of Justice League: No Justice through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. If you’re a fan of massive team ups, then you’re in luck! Justice League: No Justice contains a huge cast of characters, including: Batman, Wonder Woman, Robin, Superman, The Flash, Cyborg, Nightwing, Starfire, Raven, Beast Boy, Harley Quinn, Deathstroke, Starro, Brainiac, Lobo, the Green Lantern Corps even make an appearance. There are many more that I’m sure I’ve failed to mention. I lo I received a copy of Justice League: No Justice through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. If you’re a fan of massive team ups, then you’re in luck! Justice League: No Justice contains a huge cast of characters, including: Batman, Wonder Woman, Robin, Superman, The Flash, Cyborg, Nightwing, Starfire, Raven, Beast Boy, Harley Quinn, Deathstroke, Starro, Brainiac, Lobo, the Green Lantern Corps even make an appearance. There are many more that I’m sure I’ve failed to mention. I love watching character interactions, especially when they’re not normally in that particular team-up, so I was really looking forward to No Justice. Additionally I’ve been reading Justice League Dark, which I’m pretty sure this volume sets up for. I wish I had read this first, but mistakes happen, right? (view spoiler)[ This is one of those (usually) rare moments where the good guys and the bad guys have to team up to save the world. These stories can be highly dramatic, which sprinkled with humor, thanks to the conflicting nature of the characters involved. No Justice was no exception. Being that there are so many different characters to follow, as well as a rather unique plot, it was difficult at times to fully understand what was going on during No Justice. Part of the problem is that I didn’t read the events leading up to this mess. I know it was Waller and her team (the Suicide Squad) that started it, but I don’t really know what their mission was or the endgame at all. Since there was so much ground to cover, there was almost no time wasted on slow moments, and thus the pacing was very fast. This gave us a lot of information, and a lot of action. Considering that was pretty much exactly what I was hoping for from this, I can’t really complain. I did love all the cameos that occurred during this volume. Some of the characters took more focus than others, but I think on the whole they balanced it out very well, giving most of the characters a chance to shine, or at least a moment to make a funny or snarky quip. To be honest though, the best part about No Justice is how many of the villains stepped up and redeemed themselves, Starro especially…but at the end of the day Waller’s still a jerk (to put it kindly). She had no redeeming moment, and in fact she quite possibly caused half the problems in this plot…which sounds about right. Actually, I take that back. She totally is the root of most of the problems here. Go ahead and give her all the blame. She deserves it. I wonder where this will lead to next. I have a feeling we’ll be seeing another universal threat coming out of this, but I just don’t know what (minus what is happening in Justice League Dark). I think it’ll end up affecting more than one series, but I could be wrong. (hide spoiler)]

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    What we have here is a four part, convoluted, action packed, character stuffed preview to the remaking of the teaming of the DCU and the actions of its villains. Scott Snyder, the driver of much of what is happening at DC from a writing perspective (see the Batman wedding saga) has created a saga where the Justice League, Titans, Teen Titans, Suicide Squad and assorted super villains are assembled by Braniac to battle four elemental cosmic foes who have come to devour first his home world and th What we have here is a four part, convoluted, action packed, character stuffed preview to the remaking of the teaming of the DCU and the actions of its villains. Scott Snyder, the driver of much of what is happening at DC from a writing perspective (see the Batman wedding saga) has created a saga where the Justice League, Titans, Teen Titans, Suicide Squad and assorted super villains are assembled by Braniac to battle four elemental cosmic foes who have come to devour first his home world and then Earth. It seems that when last saving the multiverse, the Justice League broke the Source Wall holding the multiverse together. Having done source, it released the four ancient, cosmic world eating elemental beings of mystery, power, entropy and wonder who head first to Braniac’s home world and then to Earth. Braniac divides the assembled superheroes and villains into distinct teams to battle each one and away we go. It is nonstop action from then on with appearances by Green Arrow and Amanda Waller, not to mention Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps. At the end of the day, the future of the Justice League and other teams is teased out as are some other future plot lines. None of that helps save the convoluted nature of the story Snyder has put together as my outline may have hinted. It is difficult to follow and somewhat hard to tell exactly who was where and sometimes why. Nevertheless there are surprise highlights and heroes. I don’t want to spoil it by saying much more but the true hero of the story is not a superhero at the beginning. For the most part, the art is good and contributes mightily to the flow and understanding of the story. There are some inconsistencies arising from multiple artist which aren’t helpful but thery are mostly minor. In sum, this was far from Snyder’s best outing and it doesn’t make me too terribly hopeful for the future direction of the Justice League, by far one of my favorite team ups. Again, I won’t spoil it with the direction it appears to be taking personnel wise, but if what appears to be happening is true, i’m happy about the addition and really, really not happy about the subtraction as I suspect will be the vast majority of JL fans.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Cesar

    Mesmo com uma ideia fantástica em mãos, Scott Snyder parece que nunca consegue manter a bola na jogada e marcar ponto. O outrora diretor dá o pontapé inicial de uma nova fase como roteirista da revista mensal da Liga da Justiça, e para isso ele escreve uma minissérie em 4 partes com o nome de No Justice (Sem Justiça), que mostra um dos efeitos das ações dos heróis ao tentar deter o avanço do Multiverso das Trevas. A ameaça agora é decorrente da abertura da Muralha da Fonte, de onde saíram quatro Mesmo com uma ideia fantástica em mãos, Scott Snyder parece que nunca consegue manter a bola na jogada e marcar ponto. O outrora diretor dá o pontapé inicial de uma nova fase como roteirista da revista mensal da Liga da Justiça, e para isso ele escreve uma minissérie em 4 partes com o nome de No Justice (Sem Justiça), que mostra um dos efeitos das ações dos heróis ao tentar deter o avanço do Multiverso das Trevas. A ameaça agora é decorrente da abertura da Muralha da Fonte, de onde saíram quatro entidades que põem em risco a vida de todo o universo: os Titãs Ômega. Para detê-los, Brainiac reúne heróis e vilões em quatro equipes, unindo-os com sua tecnologia com foco nas energias que cada uma delas consome: entropia, sabedoria, maravilha e mistério. A história começa bem, mas nosso Snyder não consegue manter o padrão do 1º número e a partir do 2º tudo começa a desandar. A tentativa de fazer de cada quadrinho uma cena épica cansa e não há nada grandioso e epopeico. Os conflitos entre os heróis e os vilões são rasos e não convencem; e os tais Titãs Ômega? Não passam de enormes MacGuffins e que não inspiram o senso real de perigo. Lá para a 3ª edição, o desenhista já não é o mesmo do começo, dando lugar a dupla Riley Rossmo e Marcus To cujos estilos não combinam com os personagens; além disso, o roteiro enrola ainda mais o leitor, pois é claro, a batalha principal será na Terra. Como forçar a barra e descaracterizar personagens é comum para Snyder, temos um vilão que sempre foi impiedoso e cruel, sem sentimentos e sem moral nenhuma sacrificar-se em prol dos outros membros de equipe. Não há nenhuma explicação clara para os uniformes com "tecnologia" (bolas brilhantes) de Brainiac, mas a principal deve ser apenas para vender bonequinhos. No final, a história acrescenta nada à mitologia dos personagens e só serve como uma prequel de histórias futuras da Liga da Justiça.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Justice League: No Justice' by Scott Snyder and Joshua Williamson with most of the art by Francis Manapul is a follow up story from the recent Dark Nights: Metal event in the DC universe. I liked it better than most of that event. Because of Batman's actions, the walls between the multiverses are thinning. The person who has a plan to repair this is Brainiac. There are four main titans and four main trees. He forms four teams of heroes, and even villains, who are best to combat each threat. For 'Justice League: No Justice' by Scott Snyder and Joshua Williamson with most of the art by Francis Manapul is a follow up story from the recent Dark Nights: Metal event in the DC universe. I liked it better than most of that event. Because of Batman's actions, the walls between the multiverses are thinning. The person who has a plan to repair this is Brainiac. There are four main titans and four main trees. He forms four teams of heroes, and even villains, who are best to combat each threat. For example, Team Mystery has Martian Manhunter, Superman, Starfire, Starro, and Sinestro. How each of these teams will get along is part of the story. When something happens to Brainiac, the plan goes with him, and the teams are left to figure things out for themselves before things go really wrong. The four trees and four titans thing was weird, and I'm not sure I really understood what was happening, but it was more coherent that the Metal event. The Lanterns and Supergirl show up, but then seem to just go away without doing anything. Maybe they were doing things in their own books. The story wasn't bad, but the art is where this graphic novel shines. Francis Manapul is one of my favorites. His art has a clean look that just shines. The characters look great and it's not hard to follow what's happening. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from DC Entertainment and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The source wall that surrounds the multiverse is broken allowing new enemies to enter our dimension. Who are they? They are the Omega Titans. They are 4 large beings that feed off Mystery, Entrophy, Wonder and Wisdom. Their assignment from Brainiac has heroes and villains working together in teams. However Brainiac iskilled before they are given the orders on how to fight them. Will these teams be able to figure out what they must do to save Colu and Earth? It’s action packed with wondrous color The source wall that surrounds the multiverse is broken allowing new enemies to enter our dimension. Who are they? They are the Omega Titans. They are 4 large beings that feed off Mystery, Entrophy, Wonder and Wisdom. Their assignment from Brainiac has heroes and villains working together in teams. However Brainiac iskilled before they are given the orders on how to fight them. Will these teams be able to figure out what they must do to save Colu and Earth? It’s action packed with wondrous color illustrations and an interesting plot. It is perfect and should be a new beginning of a new series. I would recommend this highly to Justice League followers. Disclaimer: I received the arc of this book from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I was not obligated to write a favorable review or any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Darkish

    I have trouble with series like this-- there are just so many DC characters that it can be difficult to follow the action, to care about all of the ways the vast cast intersects, especially if you only are familiar with like half the characters, and only care about an even smaller portion than that. It's also hard to get invested in a potentially universe-destroying action when many aspects of what it is that could be destroying everything is introduced in just a couple of pages and then everyth I have trouble with series like this-- there are just so many DC characters that it can be difficult to follow the action, to care about all of the ways the vast cast intersects, especially if you only are familiar with like half the characters, and only care about an even smaller portion than that. It's also hard to get invested in a potentially universe-destroying action when many aspects of what it is that could be destroying everything is introduced in just a couple of pages and then everything gets resolved in just a few comic issues (within a single collected volume). Add in the fact that a few of the issues have some of the worst art I've seen in a DC comic in a long time and you have a book not worth picking up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lestat

    Way too much crazy going on here - and only half the characters are the interesting kind. From the Bat-family they chose to keep Batman and Damian Wayne? Seriously? Damian is such a pain in the neck, absolutely hate that character. It was just histrionic chaos with the angst and anguish dialed to the max. I could almost feel the heavy orchestral music crescendo-ing throughout the 100+ pages. I don't know why, but I didn't enjoy this at all - I should have, but I didn't. There was something so meh Way too much crazy going on here - and only half the characters are the interesting kind. From the Bat-family they chose to keep Batman and Damian Wayne? Seriously? Damian is such a pain in the neck, absolutely hate that character. It was just histrionic chaos with the angst and anguish dialed to the max. I could almost feel the heavy orchestral music crescendo-ing throughout the 100+ pages. I don't know why, but I didn't enjoy this at all - I should have, but I didn't. There was something so meh about its precocious need to be a credible game-changer in the DC Universe. It simply didn't work for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe Martin

    This 4 issues series was an excellent revitalization the series needed, though when you read the synopsis you'd likely expect disaster. Clashing together four separate teams of various heroes and villains allowed for many memorable moments, both fun and serious, notably between Martian Manhunter and Lex Luthor and MM with Starro or as he refers to him, Marty. This series served as a good bridge between the Metal series into the New Justice League rolling out after this. A lot of good personality This 4 issues series was an excellent revitalization the series needed, though when you read the synopsis you'd likely expect disaster. Clashing together four separate teams of various heroes and villains allowed for many memorable moments, both fun and serious, notably between Martian Manhunter and Lex Luthor and MM with Starro or as he refers to him, Marty. This series served as a good bridge between the Metal series into the New Justice League rolling out after this. A lot of good personality being shown all about and sets up a promising aftermath that leaves you wonder what else could truly happen after that universal sized debacle.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    This one was close. The story's big and fun and relatively exciting, with some crazy ideas in the mix (Snyder puts his strengths to good use here). At the same time, 4 issues weren't quite enough to sensibly explain everything that happens. You can follow it alright, but it skips around too much for any of the various elements to really settle in. The mini-series is meant to be a bridge from Metal (which I haven't read) to the new Justice League. As a transition, it's enjoyable, and it sets up so This one was close. The story's big and fun and relatively exciting, with some crazy ideas in the mix (Snyder puts his strengths to good use here). At the same time, 4 issues weren't quite enough to sensibly explain everything that happens. You can follow it alright, but it skips around too much for any of the various elements to really settle in. The mini-series is meant to be a bridge from Metal (which I haven't read) to the new Justice League. As a transition, it's enjoyable, and it sets up some interesting stuff, but this one probably makes more sense for a serious DC reader than for a casual fan looking to pick up a quick one-off story. [Based on a NetGalley edition.]

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The rules in play are a little messy and the story doesn’t have a ton of room to breath in just four issues (not that I needed it to be prolonged). Over all it’s okay. It can’t help but be a transition from Metal to new Justice League books. There’s gonna be some oddball team With Cyborg, but the intro art of Darkseid in the background has my interest. Justice League Dark looks interesting also (especially Tynions Upside down man he’s teased on twitter) And then the third team looks like a traditiona The rules in play are a little messy and the story doesn’t have a ton of room to breath in just four issues (not that I needed it to be prolonged). Over all it’s okay. It can’t help but be a transition from Metal to new Justice League books. There’s gonna be some oddball team With Cyborg, but the intro art of Darkseid in the background has my interest. Justice League Dark looks interesting also (especially Tynions Upside down man he’s teased on twitter) And then the third team looks like a traditional League. All in all an entertaining diversion serving as a transition to better stuff, while not particularly memorable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danijel Jedriško

    "No Justice" continues the story of "Dark Nights: Metal" and in doing so unveils no threats to the universe. Our heroes will have to overcome personal grievances with Legion of Evil, and work alongside them to divert threats that are waiting behind the broken wall. "No Justice" gives substance to the "Dark Nights" because in this volume becomes clear what awaits behind the curtain of our universe. Recommended ad requested read if you want to understand new DC comics and the things behind them.

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