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New Spring: The Graphic Novel: The Graphic Novel

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In the last few years before his death, Robert Jordan worked closely with Chuck Dixon and Mike Miller on the graphic adaptation of New Spring. The eight full-color issues of New Spring, released between 2005 and 2010, tell the story of the search for the infant Dragon Reborn and of the adventures of Moiraine Damodred, a young Aes Sedai, and Lan Mandragoran, the uncrowned k In the last few years before his death, Robert Jordan worked closely with Chuck Dixon and Mike Miller on the graphic adaptation of New Spring. The eight full-color issues of New Spring, released between 2005 and 2010, tell the story of the search for the infant Dragon Reborn and of the adventures of Moiraine Damodred, a young Aes Sedai, and Lan Mandragoran, the uncrowned king of a long-dead nation.  Adapted by noted comics writer Chuck Dixon with the full cooperation of Robert Jordan, and illustrated by artists Mike Miller and Harvey Tolibao, New Spring will delight any of Robert Jordan’s millions of readers. Tor is proud to collect all eight issues of New Spring in a single volume, which will also include developmental art, script pages, and correspondence between Jordan and Dixon.


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In the last few years before his death, Robert Jordan worked closely with Chuck Dixon and Mike Miller on the graphic adaptation of New Spring. The eight full-color issues of New Spring, released between 2005 and 2010, tell the story of the search for the infant Dragon Reborn and of the adventures of Moiraine Damodred, a young Aes Sedai, and Lan Mandragoran, the uncrowned k In the last few years before his death, Robert Jordan worked closely with Chuck Dixon and Mike Miller on the graphic adaptation of New Spring. The eight full-color issues of New Spring, released between 2005 and 2010, tell the story of the search for the infant Dragon Reborn and of the adventures of Moiraine Damodred, a young Aes Sedai, and Lan Mandragoran, the uncrowned king of a long-dead nation.  Adapted by noted comics writer Chuck Dixon with the full cooperation of Robert Jordan, and illustrated by artists Mike Miller and Harvey Tolibao, New Spring will delight any of Robert Jordan’s millions of readers. Tor is proud to collect all eight issues of New Spring in a single volume, which will also include developmental art, script pages, and correspondence between Jordan and Dixon.

30 review for New Spring: The Graphic Novel: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com Um, I don't know. I couldn't really get into this graphic novel too much. I wasn't too sure about some of the things going on. That being said, I have had all of the Wheel of Time books for some time now and have not gotten to read one of them yet!! There are just so many books and too little time. I don't know if I would have started the books first if that would have helped, although I'm not sure what that would have to do with it. I thought the graphics wer www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com Um, I don't know. I couldn't really get into this graphic novel too much. I wasn't too sure about some of the things going on. That being said, I have had all of the Wheel of Time books for some time now and have not gotten to read one of them yet!! There are just so many books and too little time. I don't know if I would have started the books first if that would have helped, although I'm not sure what that would have to do with it. I thought the graphics were so beautiful! I will add a couple on my blog as usual. But, something weird happened to the graphics toward the end. People started looking a little cartoon-ish and I think this is where I got really lost. They have bonus material at the back showing Robert Jordan corresponding to the artists, etc. There is also an illustrated glossary at the back of the book that I liked in particular. I like al'Lan Mandragoran. He's uh.. cool. I also thought the Ogier are the most awesome looking beings. I would like to have seen more of them :) Overall, it was a decent graphic novel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vladimir

    Super je bilo videti kako su zamislili likove, Tar Valon, Aijele... i što su malo produbili priču. Sve ono što je u noveli tek spomenuto (prvenstveno kako su Moiraina i Sijuan provele svoje početke u Beloj Kuli) ovde je dato malo više prostora i lepo objašnjeno.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Overall this is a really decent conversion of New Spring into a graphic novel. For the first seven chapters the artwork is just beautiful, almost making up for the crappy TOR cover art of the Wheel of Time, and in general the story was converted with care. I most definitely enjoyed reading this novel. HOWEVER, I don't know what happened with chapter eight, but suddenly the artwork was shit and the typos in the text went through the roof. I'm being hyperbolic but the decrease in quality really was Overall this is a really decent conversion of New Spring into a graphic novel. For the first seven chapters the artwork is just beautiful, almost making up for the crappy TOR cover art of the Wheel of Time, and in general the story was converted with care. I most definitely enjoyed reading this novel. HOWEVER, I don't know what happened with chapter eight, but suddenly the artwork was shit and the typos in the text went through the roof. I'm being hyperbolic but the decrease in quality really was that noticeable. I don't know if a new artist came on board or what, but whatever went on created a terribly lackluster end to the book. I was too distracted by "is that supposed to be Moiraine? is that supposed to be Suian?" to really enjoy the final chapter. Though it must be noted that the final chapter might have been kind of ruined anyway since it rushed through the climax of the original book. Now I've seen plenty of comics which have a least one "box" (don't know if this is the correct terminology) that is just a picture between two boxes that have text on them to great a sense of "pause" for dramatic effect. *This desperately needed some of those*. As well as some boxes which conveyed the shock and drama of the climatic scenes. But there were none of those. It was a very disappointing ending to an otherwise enjoyable reading experience.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    For the most part I felt like this was a really great adaptation of the novel. I loved the detail and faithful retelling. The first 7 chapters had fantastic art and I loved seeing some of my favorite characters and favorite institution of the series put into visual form. Unfortunately the 8th chapter is done by a different design team and it really shows. It's not the worst art I've seen (it's better than some of the Buffy season 8 stuff) but it detracts from the great 7 chapters before it. I kn For the most part I felt like this was a really great adaptation of the novel. I loved the detail and faithful retelling. The first 7 chapters had fantastic art and I loved seeing some of my favorite characters and favorite institution of the series put into visual form. Unfortunately the 8th chapter is done by a different design team and it really shows. It's not the worst art I've seen (it's better than some of the Buffy season 8 stuff) but it detracts from the great 7 chapters before it. I know a lot of stuff went on behind the scenes which is unfortunate and uncontrollable. One unfortunate event was the passing of Robert Jordan. This definitely impacted how Chapter 8 appears. He had specific opinions and input on the first 7 chapters and this is why they came out to be as awesome as they were. Chapter 8 breaks the rules too much. If you read the bonus material you'll see the RJ specifically said no off the shoulder dresses and we see in several places women wearing off the shoulder dresses. It's a shame, but as a fan I'm just glad New Spring was completed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jaslyn

    A New Spring is the prequel to the Wheel of Time series and it tells the story of Moiraine and Siuan and how the began as Accepted and were put on the path to finding the Dragon Reborn, before finally being raised Aes Sedai and being able to search for him. Moiraine also meets Lan and bonds him as her warder. I actually really like seeing Moiraine and Siuan and young women, it makes it easier to relate to them. The only thing I didn't like in this story in general was it didn't span enough time a A New Spring is the prequel to the Wheel of Time series and it tells the story of Moiraine and Siuan and how the began as Accepted and were put on the path to finding the Dragon Reborn, before finally being raised Aes Sedai and being able to search for him. Moiraine also meets Lan and bonds him as her warder. I actually really like seeing Moiraine and Siuan and young women, it makes it easier to relate to them. The only thing I didn't like in this story in general was it didn't span enough time and give the reader an idea on how Moiraine came to be heading towards the Two Rivers and how it was that Siuan became the Amyrlin. What I like about graphic novels is that it can really help to bring the characters and the story to life. I really enjoyed the pictures in this, how they looked, facial expressions, it was all great. Of course there's not as much text to pick up the story by so I'd definitely be wanting to read the book in full before reading the graphic novel. The only comment I really have to make about some of the images is in the detail. But you know, the devil is in the detail! The coloured bands on the Accepted dresses changed order sometimes. It went from say brown, white then grey, to brown, grey then white. I also didn't feel that Moiraine's height was portrayed that well either. She's Cairheinin so should be heaps shorter than everyone, but was often the same height. Asides from that I really enjoyed being able to devour my favourite series in a new way. I'll definitely be getting my hands on the graphic novels for Eye of the World. I'm not sure if there are plans to keep going beyond the first book though, if anyone knows can you please send me a message or something? Thank you! Read more on my blog.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I received this book through goodreads first-reads. Okay it's really hard for me to judge this graphic novel, so I will do my best to be fair. For one, I found this to be a very confusing read. And that might just be my ADHD talking, but there is SO MUCH going on all at once, it was very difficult for me to get a lot of this straight. I would need a long time to try to explain everything to someone else. I would have found the illustrated guide to characters and meanings a lot more helpful if it I received this book through goodreads first-reads. Okay it's really hard for me to judge this graphic novel, so I will do my best to be fair. For one, I found this to be a very confusing read. And that might just be my ADHD talking, but there is SO MUCH going on all at once, it was very difficult for me to get a lot of this straight. I would need a long time to try to explain everything to someone else. I would have found the illustrated guide to characters and meanings a lot more helpful if it had been in the front of the book instead of the back. But even then, I would've constantly been going back to it to try and understand the more complex parts that were going on. And that really is what brings this down to 3 stars. But a plus to this is, what I did understand of this novel was a pretty interesting story. And when I was able to understand, I was invested in the characters and their choices. Another plus was that the illustrations are absolutely gorgeous, my hats off to the artists. This book is full of magic, fighting, and complex sub plots. If you are a fan of them, I think you'll enjoy this GN. It brings to mind Game of Thrones as well, so if you enjoy that, you might enjoy this too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    Loved it! New Spring is the prequel to the Wheel of Time massive series, and here it got graphic novel treatment, with full input from the author, Robert Jordan, before he died. I loved finally seeing Tar Valon, the White Tower, Dragonmount and many other reference points from the novels. Lots of "tasteful" nudity (no nipples!) which was distracting but very true to the books. Also fun to see major players from the end of the series appearing as novices and bit players. Kind of ominous to realize Loved it! New Spring is the prequel to the Wheel of Time massive series, and here it got graphic novel treatment, with full input from the author, Robert Jordan, before he died. I loved finally seeing Tar Valon, the White Tower, Dragonmount and many other reference points from the novels. Lots of "tasteful" nudity (no nipples!) which was distracting but very true to the books. Also fun to see major players from the end of the series appearing as novices and bit players. Kind of ominous to realize just how many ended up eeeeeevillll.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kerry *Soulcaster*

    *Read on the heels of my latest New Spring reread* I always enjoy the quality of Chuck Dixon's book adaptions and the artwork was fantastic.

  9. 4 out of 5

    La Espada en la Tinta

    Una reseña del cómic en: http://www.laespadaenlatinta.com/2013...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonas Skoglund

    As true to the original story as a graphic novel could be. A nice adaptation!

  11. 5 out of 5

    BooksInPhotos

    I liked it better than the Eye of the World Graphic Novel. Probably because I didn't read New Spring.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andres Carter

    lovely art - Lan and Moraine love story

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nidah (SleepDreamWrite)

    This was interesting. Never heard of this before. Good volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    CharlotteReads

    Cheesy, as to be expected. I like some cheesy Robert Jordan.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marlowe

    I'm still making my way through A Memory of Light, but I came across the New Spring graphic novel at the library and thought I would give it a try. It's been almost exactly a year since I first started the Wheel of Time series, beginning with the prequel (though it wasn't published until the series was already well under way, I wanted to get the plot in order). So it's been a while, enough time for the graphic novel to be a lovely refresher as I make my way through the culmination of the story. I I'm still making my way through A Memory of Light, but I came across the New Spring graphic novel at the library and thought I would give it a try. It's been almost exactly a year since I first started the Wheel of Time series, beginning with the prequel (though it wasn't published until the series was already well under way, I wanted to get the plot in order). So it's been a while, enough time for the graphic novel to be a lovely refresher as I make my way through the culmination of the story. I was reminded of how much I hadn't grasped when I first read the prequel. The biggest example of this is the Aiel. Since the descriptions of them in the book compared them to demons and dark friends, and their faces were always covered, and their culture was entirely alien to all the POV characters in the book, I had assumed that they were something more like trollocs than people. It wasn't until a subsequent book that I realized they were just meant to be another culture. This made Lan's chapters difficult to read. I just didn't get them, I couldn't picture the battles in my mind. With Moiraine, however, enough was familiar that I could find my footing pretty quickly. Having now fully submerged myself in the Wheel of Time universe, I was able to pick up a lot more from the graphic novel. For example, I had completely forgotten that Moiraine had met Cadsuane, and knowing who Cadsuane is now, that encounter makes a lot more sense. (Same goes for Elaida.) As for the graphic novel itself, it was fine. The art was mostly very clean (except for the last chapter and epilogue, where there's a sudden change in style and drop in quality), and it was interesting to see how the characters were represented - even if the images don't always agree with what I have in my head. I also felt like the artwork was overly sexualized. Most of the women are too skinny for their organs, and they all have perfect pert breasts. It's a little jarring to see characters who are identified almost exclusively by their intellects in the book to all be supermodels in the graphic novel. This really comes through in Jordan's e-mails, provided at the end of the book. In the e-mails, he is correcting errors made by the adaptation team, and frequently has to remind them to de-sexy the female characters. It's unfortunate that, although he specifically mentions that there should not be any low necklines, and no off-the-shoulder dresses, on several occasions, and yet the final chapter (which I am given to understand was drawn after Jordan's death) includes them anyway. I guess because he wasn't there to to reign in the impulse for sexifying any more? It's a shame. That said, I did really like the way that channelling was depicted. I've occasionally wondered how a graphic/movie adaptation could handle Weaving, given the way it's described in the books, and I think they did a really good job. The dialogue was okay. They did that weird thing that I've noticed in comic books where they bold certain words, and I really don't understand it. My brain always wants to put more emphasis on those words because they are in bold, but then it interrupts the rhythm of speech. I noticed some typos, or perhaps just very poor word choices that made the dialogue more confusing that it needed to be. I think, though I may be wrong, that this occurred more frequently in the final chapter - where the artwork suffered as well. I suspect the two are related. In all, I found it an interesting little exercise, as someone who has read most of the Wheel of Time series, to get to revisit part of the story in a different format. I couldn't recommend it to someone who hadn't already read the book, however. There's just too much going on, too many subplots, and the graphic novel just doesn't really do a very good job of providing backstory. I understand the constraints of the format, but I do think that the adaptation team could have done a better job.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ranting Dragon

    http://www.rantingdragon.com/review-o... On January 18, Tor released a trade paperback graphic novel of the comic adaption of New Spring, the prequel to Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time. As a huge fan of Jordan’s series, I just had to get my hands on New Spring: The Graphic Novel. The story of New Spring was first released in 1998 as a short story in the anthology Legends: Stories By The Masters of Modern Fantasy. Later, it was turned into a short novel, published in 2004, which was supposed to b http://www.rantingdragon.com/review-o... On January 18, Tor released a trade paperback graphic novel of the comic adaption of New Spring, the prequel to Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time. As a huge fan of Jordan’s series, I just had to get my hands on New Spring: The Graphic Novel. The story of New Spring was first released in 1998 as a short story in the anthology Legends: Stories By The Masters of Modern Fantasy. Later, it was turned into a short novel, published in 2004, which was supposed to be the first in a never-completed prequel trilogy for The Wheel of Time. Close to the novel This version of the story, New Spring: The Graphic Novel, follows the events of the novel closely. With the story fresh in my mind from my re-read only two weeks ago (reviewed here), I recognized much of the dialogue and other text from the book. Like the novel, the graphic novel is set twenty years before the beginning of The Eye of the World, the first volume of The Wheel of Time. It tells the story of Moiraine and Siuan, two Accepted—students to the Aes Sedai, female users of magic in Jordan’s world. When they overhear a prophesy not intended for their ears, their lives are thrown into turmoil, especially when they discover that everyone else who knew about the prophesy died under suspicious circumstances. Missing details Sometimes, however, the graphic novel follows the original a bit too closely. As is inevitable with a comic adaption like this, many parts of the narration didn’t make it into the artwork. That, in itself, isn’t a problem. It does become a problem when details are left out but the text talking about these details is kept unchanged. An example of this is one of the other Accepted, a friend of Moiraine and Siuan, who the comic reader will not meet until her very last appearance where it is assumed that they already know who she is. Astonishing artwork The artwork in New Spring: The Graphic Novel is astonishing. Not only does it look great, it has captured both characters and atmosphere perfectly. The costume design looks amazing and true to Jordan’s creation. The two things I loved most about the art were the weaves of The One Power, which were depicted just as I imagined it and, strange as it may sound, the nudity during Moiraine’s testing. This isn’t full-frontal nudity, mind you. In fact, you don’t get to see anything at all, and by drawing it so, it is both tasteful and classy, showing the serenity of an Aes Sedai that I believe Robert Jordan tried to convene in this scene. What does bug me about the art, though, are the different styles that are used. Styles of art vary from chapter to chapter and the final chapter was the most significantly different. In this last chapter, even the characters looked different than they did in the other volumes. Why should you read this graphic novel? Despite its flaws, New Spring: The Graphic Novel is a must-read for every fan of The Wheel of Time. With the addition of much extra background information, including an introduction to the world written by Robert Jordan himself, it is also a great start for first time readers that might find an 800 page book a little daunting. The best parts of this graphic novel, however, are the bonus materials. Any fan will geek out over the many emails by Mr. Jordan, where his passion for this world and his eye for detail are again emphasized. And guess what? There is an actual Old Tongue alphabet! I’m sure that, if you are a fan, you’ll be running to the store right now.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zezee

    (As posted on Zezee with Books.) Quick summary: Like the novel, this is a prequel to the books that make up Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series. In this installment, we see the prediction that the Dragon will be reborn as well as Moiraine and Siuan’s induction into the Blue Ajah. Lan is also shown and we learn how he became Moiraine’s warder. My thoughts: (spoilers) It’s been about a year and four months since I read the novel version of this and I still think this installment was unnecessary. I th (As posted on Zezee with Books.) Quick summary: Like the novel, this is a prequel to the books that make up Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series. In this installment, we see the prediction that the Dragon will be reborn as well as Moiraine and Siuan’s induction into the Blue Ajah. Lan is also shown and we learn how he became Moiraine’s warder. My thoughts: (spoilers) It’s been about a year and four months since I read the novel version of this and I still think this installment was unnecessary. I think all of it could have been surmised from character’s flashbacks or whenever they mused on the past. I don’t think it added any pertinent, new information except, maybe, for letting us know why Moiraine and Siuan made it their duty to find the reborned Dragon but the reasons given for this were weak. Seriously, if two Accepteds could easily figure out the Amrylin Seat’s plan, then I’m not surprised that she died. Regarding this graphic novel, I appreciate that it gives me a visual for the events that occur in this installment, but I don’t think it was well done. There were some inconsistencies in the story line because some minor things were cut. For example, Ellid dies when trying for the shawl and it’s only then that we learn that she wanted to be in the Green Ajah, but she wasn’t mentioned before so I felt a little confused there. Also, when Moiraine decides to leave Tar Valon, her seamstress is mentioned but we don’t see her visiting the seamstress. Maybe I’m just nitpicking with that last one but there are some inconsistencies that confused me a little and would baffle others if they’ve forgotten most of the novel. However, I understand that much had to be cut to fit the story to one graphic novel. The reason why I decided to get New Spring instead of The Eye of the World is because the entire New Spring story is in one issue whereas The Eye of the World is spread over six issues. Despite the inconsistencies, it does a good job of giving a visual for scenes in the novel. We see Elaida helping the girls practice for their testing in her cruel way and we see how some Aes Sedais are punished. (Why must the women abuse each other so?) As for the artwork, it’s okay. I’m not a big fan of it but there are certain things I like, for example, the details in the trollocs and the collages on the full-page spreads. There are some inconsistencies in the illustrations as well because towards the end the characters’ faces look different. Also, I’m not a fan of the typography used for the narration. It is inconsistent and the script typography in the early pages dazzle my eyes whenever there’s a bunch of words grouped together. I prefer it towards the end. Overall: ★★☆☆☆ The graphic novel does a good job of showing the major events that occur in the novel but there are inconsistencies in the story, artwork, and typography. However, I do recommend you read it if you were confused by any events in the novel.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Earl Grey Tea

    I bought this graphic novel a long time ago and just finally got around to reading it. I am a big fan of The Wheel of Time series and thought that it was a neat idea that they brought the story to this medium. Movie directors have to make a lot of hard decisions when they adapt the book into a movie. The authors of this book had to do the same thing. As someone who has read all of the books, I was able to follow the story quite well. If I, however, had never heard of the Wheel of Time series befo I bought this graphic novel a long time ago and just finally got around to reading it. I am a big fan of The Wheel of Time series and thought that it was a neat idea that they brought the story to this medium. Movie directors have to make a lot of hard decisions when they adapt the book into a movie. The authors of this book had to do the same thing. As someone who has read all of the books, I was able to follow the story quite well. If I, however, had never heard of the Wheel of Time series before picking up this book, I think I would have a hard time trying to following the story line. The illustrators in this book made artistic choices based on their artistic abilities and interpretation of the book. For many things in the book, I appreciate the way the artist brought the world to life. In other aspects, their choices just went totally against how I saw this world in my mind when I was reading. One key example is the White Tower. Instead of a stout, round tower that would be stereotypical of medieval Europe found in this book, I imagined a sleek, tall tower with sweeping curves that made the building look fragile. Different artists have different styles of drawing. However, the sudden shift in style interrupted to flow of the story when I started chapter seven. Moraine looked so different in the last part of the book when a new artist took over, it took me a little while to realize that she wasn’t a new character. I understand that there is a lot of pressure to complete a comic book on time, especially those that are done in full color. However, I felt that level of drawing in this book wasn’t as good as what I’ve seen in other graphic novels. I have no plans to buy the rest of the books in the series. However, if I notice that one of my friends have the books on their bookshelf, I would be incline to borrow and read them.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Won on Goodreads in June 2012. Apparently this was based on a novel, one that I have not read. To start off we are given a very basic background and then thrown right into the story. The rule of "show, don't tell" is ignored in this comic. Much of the information is told to us via text boxes rather than imagery. There are a lots of characters that are not given any depth; they simply appear to disappear. Many events are not well explained. The focus appears to be on Moiraine, but then it shifts t Won on Goodreads in June 2012. Apparently this was based on a novel, one that I have not read. To start off we are given a very basic background and then thrown right into the story. The rule of "show, don't tell" is ignored in this comic. Much of the information is told to us via text boxes rather than imagery. There are a lots of characters that are not given any depth; they simply appear to disappear. Many events are not well explained. The focus appears to be on Moiraine, but then it shifts to Lan at random without transition. There is not context given for it until they meet. I looked up more information and saw that this was a prequel to a series of novels. I don't feel I should have to look to outside sources to find information on what I am reading now. I do hope this is not a stand alone graphic novel then, as it has a very unfinished and jumbled story set up feel. We are left more confused at the end than when we started. If it was a one off thing then there should have been something done to help it be a stand alone book. For text formatting, I found the text boxes, but not speech bubbles, way too small. There was ample space on the page for them but instead they were tiny. The text inside them was so small I almost needed a magnifying glass to read it. The art in the last two chapters changes a lot. The last chapter was essentially a nice sketch. There were shading guidelines all over. In one page I actually saw the guidelines printed in the paper the page was drawn on. That is unacceptable for a finished publication. A change in art is one thing, but this chapter the artist just didn't care about. The special features at the end would be great for fans of the author and novel series but are too much information for a first-time reader of the graphic novel. The glossary is needed to explain some things like the Ajah and the Aiel to the reader because those are not explained well in the story itself.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Margot

    I didn't actually enjoy the original version of New Spring, so I'm not sure why I wanted to read the graphic novel other than for a masochistic need for thoroughness. From page one, the graphic novel adaptation promised no improvement but looked like it was provisioning up to be worse than the original. The graphic novel adaptation poses similar challenges to that of a movie adaptation. The form relies on visuals and dialogue, with little opportunity for direct exposition. The New Spring graphic I didn't actually enjoy the original version of New Spring, so I'm not sure why I wanted to read the graphic novel other than for a masochistic need for thoroughness. From page one, the graphic novel adaptation promised no improvement but looked like it was provisioning up to be worse than the original. The graphic novel adaptation poses similar challenges to that of a movie adaptation. The form relies on visuals and dialogue, with little opportunity for direct exposition. The New Spring graphic novel completely ignores that reality, giving us huge swaths of narrative, expository text explaining the scenes presented to the reader in each spread. In this medium, for the most part, I think the graphics should explain themselves. Yes, sometimes you miss out on a little nuance (especially depending on how long you spend looking at each illustration). But no one picks up a graphic novel expecting to read the Bible. Suffice it to say, I skimmed a lot. Some things I did enjoy included the depictions of young Moiraine and Siuan, and some of the intricate and lovely dress details. I could not tell the Borderlandian men apart very well and relied mostly on the context of their dialogue to determine who was saying what. One most peculiar thing was the illustration quality, which changed about two-thirds of the way through the story into a sloppy, un-detailed mess. I'm not sure if several different artists did illustrations for different segments of the book or perhaps that Jordan didn't live to quality control through the entire production, so the publisher just let things slide once he wasn't looking over their shoulders anymore? But Moiraine at the end of the book looked nothing like Moiraine at the beginning, which was odd considering the very specific and rather nit-picky emails from Jordan about character appearances, included in the graphic novel end notes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    The graphic novel edition of New Spring was beautifully and masterfully done. As a recent (3 years) fan of Robert Jordan's work with the entire series of the Wheel of Time New Spring as a novel on its own stands as one of my least favourite works in the series. It lacks for me the epic nature of the other novels even though it provides a little interesting background information. I think I liked the graphic novel version far more than the text version. Which is of course a rarity to me. I general The graphic novel edition of New Spring was beautifully and masterfully done. As a recent (3 years) fan of Robert Jordan's work with the entire series of the Wheel of Time New Spring as a novel on its own stands as one of my least favourite works in the series. It lacks for me the epic nature of the other novels even though it provides a little interesting background information. I think I liked the graphic novel version far more than the text version. Which is of course a rarity to me. I generally prefer to be able to imagine a world for myself. To understand how the wastelands, deserts and cities would exist in their full richness. I do like to be able to see visually however whether my imagination compares to the author's. Because in the case of this graphic novel Robert Jordan did have a crucial role in making sure the novel appeared as he had envisioned it. And while I may have imagined a few aspects differently my version will remain my own and this simply helped me to appreciate the storyline of New Spring to greater effect. I still recommend anyone wanting to start the epic and incredibly long Wheel of Time series begins with The Eye of the World. While I do not enjoy it as much as I enjoy the second to sixth books it is a decent entry into Jordan's imagined world. However I do recommend that if you find the first a little unimpressive that you move onto and try the second before completely giving up on the series. I myself found the second novel was better than the first which for me is a rarity in fantasy in general. I intend to do a reread of the full series this year to prepare for the final book and refresh my mind. And maybe just so I can keep track of where my friend who is reading them for the first time is going. I kind of hooked him onto the series but I have no apologies for how he's loving it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rabalcas

    Un libro con una primera parte muy lenta y con muchos nombre muy parecidos entre si, lo que te hace perder el poco avance que tiene. Al final se arregla un poco por eso le he dado las tres estrellas.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bromagin

    No. Nuh-uh. Nope. I've never read the book. I checked it out because I thought the comic book adaptation of the Hedge Knight was excellent. I thought I'd try another comic based on a fantasy series. I know the books are rather hefty. I'm thinking the story just doesn't translate well into this format for some reason or another. I think there just aren't enough pages to get the whole story in and still provide enough exposition to make you care about the characters or the magic used by the women o No. Nuh-uh. Nope. I've never read the book. I checked it out because I thought the comic book adaptation of the Hedge Knight was excellent. I thought I'd try another comic based on a fantasy series. I know the books are rather hefty. I'm thinking the story just doesn't translate well into this format for some reason or another. I think there just aren't enough pages to get the whole story in and still provide enough exposition to make you care about the characters or the magic used by the women of this world. I never once really felt like the stakes were high. By the time Lan Mandragoran show's up (very late in the book) I was kind of like "Who is this guy? Why should I care about anything that happens to him?" It was almost like the publisher said, "Graphic novels are typically x amount of pages. We aren't going over x, regardless of the story requiring it!" But then I go back and think of how long they focus on the mundane, like the Aes Sedai transcribing names of recently born boys into more legible handwriting. Guuuuh. I believe they showed this on more than one occasion. Instead of just mentioning these girls were shoehorned into mundane tasks to keep them out of the way, they take time and ink to show them doing the mundane tasks. It can't just be mentioned? Glanced at in a single panel? Sheesh. I was constantly looking to see how many pages I had left and psyching myself up so I could finish. I think reading the books before diving into this might be essential.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    It was more of a 3.5 Having read the first Wheel of Time book, I wanted to read the prequel but I didn't want to commit myself to reading the whole novel as I heard it was very slow. I found the graphic novel of prequel at a bargain price and decided to buy it. I'm glad I paid $2.00 for this and not its original price. While the story isn't boring and the art for the first 6 chapters is good, in order to read this graphic novel, you will need to have knowledge of the Wheel of Time world otherwise It was more of a 3.5 Having read the first Wheel of Time book, I wanted to read the prequel but I didn't want to commit myself to reading the whole novel as I heard it was very slow. I found the graphic novel of prequel at a bargain price and decided to buy it. I'm glad I paid $2.00 for this and not its original price. While the story isn't boring and the art for the first 6 chapters is good, in order to read this graphic novel, you will need to have knowledge of the Wheel of Time world otherwise you will be lost. The graphic novel has very few information on characters, that is makes is confusing who is who. Yes, at the back it has a glossary of the characters and whatnot but it should it been on the beginning. I enjoyed how Moraine and Lan got together, but the last chapter was just horrible drawn. It felt as if the rushed through it and unfortunately this took off one star, and half a star for not properly pacing some things. I think they should of done ten chapters instead of eight.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I thought this was a good adaption of New Spring. I have to say that I loved the artwork for the first six chapters, but the last two, what happened? It have to have been a different artist, and many of the pages were dark and it was hard to tell the difference between all the dark haired women. At one point I thought Moiraine was Lady Edeyn. I thought the ending was abrupt, but having read New Spring, I knew what happened, but if you aren't familiar with Jordan, you may be confused. I throughly I thought this was a good adaption of New Spring. I have to say that I loved the artwork for the first six chapters, but the last two, what happened? It have to have been a different artist, and many of the pages were dark and it was hard to tell the difference between all the dark haired women. At one point I thought Moiraine was Lady Edeyn. I thought the ending was abrupt, but having read New Spring, I knew what happened, but if you aren't familiar with Jordan, you may be confused. I throughly enjoyed revisiting this book again in graphic novel form. I also bought the first volume of Eye of the World and I'm looking forward to that one as well, but from the looks of the cover, it is more of the same artwork from the last two chapters of New Spring. Hopefully there will be more to come. The graphic novel is nice because readers can still get the story without all the details and description when they either don't have the time and want to revisit, or if readers are just more into graphic novels. Either way, this book is great for The Wheel of Time lovers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mayank Agarwal

    Read the novel (not graphic novel) 10 years back, when I stumbled on the graphic novel, it seemed a great way to recap on the series. The illustrations is amazing, this is what I expect from a fantasy medieval age illustrations. The chiselled faces while looking the same is still great, the similarities are not much of a problem as the characters can be separated from each other by their attire. Loved the way the city is visualized. Last chapter in the series had a change in art style, the illus Read the novel (not graphic novel) 10 years back, when I stumbled on the graphic novel, it seemed a great way to recap on the series. The illustrations is amazing, this is what I expect from a fantasy medieval age illustrations. The chiselled faces while looking the same is still great, the similarities are not much of a problem as the characters can be separated from each other by their attire. Loved the way the city is visualized. Last chapter in the series had a change in art style, the illustration turning cartoonist, which was not to my taste. The storytelling is filled with too many characters for one to remember but still does a great job with the pacing while sticking to the main plot. Again as with the illustration there is a change in storytelling for the last two to three chapters, the ending has a feel of being rushed, this spoiled the reading experience. Would give 5/5 for the first 6 chapters, 2/5 for last 2, so a 4 star rating.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Magila

    Artwork consistency! Many have made mention of this, but I do not know how better to say it than to "vote with my feet." Or fingers. The adaptation was good. The first half of the book had beautiful artwork. Than it got worse. Than it got bad. It was a travesty. It was my first Wheel of Time experience, and I enjoyed the characters and storyline. Robert Jordan was as consumed by his world as Martin, Tolkien, or any of the other fantasy authors of whom you may be aware. The book deserved a 4, or 5 Artwork consistency! Many have made mention of this, but I do not know how better to say it than to "vote with my feet." Or fingers. The adaptation was good. The first half of the book had beautiful artwork. Than it got worse. Than it got bad. It was a travesty. It was my first Wheel of Time experience, and I enjoyed the characters and storyline. Robert Jordan was as consumed by his world as Martin, Tolkien, or any of the other fantasy authors of whom you may be aware. The book deserved a 4, or 5 in the first 100-150 pages. Then, all of the sudden, everything changes. The art and ink went south. And it makes me mad! I was prepared to still give the book a 4, but then I began to read the next installment, Eye of the World. Its art picks up where this left off, and then deteriorates! The publisher and team need to know this is not ok! So 2 for you! (PS. Eye of the World is on its way to a 1!)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Owen

    The art work is spot in i really enjoyed the faces of the main characters also the womens bodies were not as a horrid as some women's bodies in comics books can be. However a few things Domani people are described as "copper skinned" they are not off white as portrayed in the graphic novel. The last chapter however is poo, the art work degrades and i don't know if it was rushed but the climax of the entire book is pretty much flat without the emotion found in the novel. Which wrecked the graphic The art work is spot in i really enjoyed the faces of the main characters also the womens bodies were not as a horrid as some women's bodies in comics books can be. However a few things Domani people are described as "copper skinned" they are not off white as portrayed in the graphic novel. The last chapter however is poo, the art work degrades and i don't know if it was rushed but the climax of the entire book is pretty much flat without the emotion found in the novel. Which wrecked the graphic novel....................................boo robert jordan boo that needed the be handled better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaimei

    I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of New Spring ... at least up until the final chapters when the artwork jarringly changed. The first chapters were very well drawn; I really got into the story, and saw an exciting glimpse of what a film or TV adaptation of The Wheel of Time could look like. Too bad about those final chapters. The bonus material, especially a sample of Robert Jordan's email instructions to the production team, is fascinating; he really knew his world down to the smallest d I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of New Spring ... at least up until the final chapters when the artwork jarringly changed. The first chapters were very well drawn; I really got into the story, and saw an exciting glimpse of what a film or TV adaptation of The Wheel of Time could look like. Too bad about those final chapters. The bonus material, especially a sample of Robert Jordan's email instructions to the production team, is fascinating; he really knew his world down to the smallest detail.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Jones

    I wasn't sure if I wanted to give this four stars or five. It is in almost every way an absolutely phenomenal graphic novel - the writing was perfectly adapted, the art is interesting and expressive, and the pacing kept me excited until the end. For the first seven chapters, though. The final chapter got a new artist or something, and the quality plummets downhill like a diving falcon. This is the chapter where important things happen, the climax and the final fight. I couldn't tell what was goi I wasn't sure if I wanted to give this four stars or five. It is in almost every way an absolutely phenomenal graphic novel - the writing was perfectly adapted, the art is interesting and expressive, and the pacing kept me excited until the end. For the first seven chapters, though. The final chapter got a new artist or something, and the quality plummets downhill like a diving falcon. This is the chapter where important things happen, the climax and the final fight. I couldn't tell what was going on half the time. I couldn't tell who was who half the time! Any other chapter, and I would have shrugged off the dip in quality. But man... This one was important!

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